reducing dust from concrete walls: paint or sealer reccomendation?


In my shelving project in the basement and spending more time down there it's become apparent just how much dust comes off the concrete walls and floors in the unfinished area of the basement. I think I'd like to go with a white or off white I think if paint is viable.
The walls in question are poured, clean, dry have been around for about 15 years if that makes any difference. Water and moisture hasn't been a problem in this basement. It gets humid in the summer, but that's about it, nothing a dehumidifier doesn't handle. The walls are dusty, and i wonder about the best way to get rid of the dust before painting. Wet old towel dragged across perhaps? Or shop vac with wide broom head might get it done?
I see Behr has a few products, but I'm curious about experiences and such. I see Behr recommends of course 2 or 3 other products for prep, I'm always suspicious there of the real need, or if they're just selling more product.
BEHR NO. 990 CONCRETE CLEANER & DEGREASER (not sure I need) BEHR NO. 991 CONCRETE ETCHER & RUST REMOVER. (etching seems to be suggested by both coating products below)
No. 875 Basement & Masonry Waterproofing Paint http://www.behr.com/behrx/act/view/products_detail?prodGroupId 8&catName=Concrete%2FMasonry+Waterproofers&catId
No. 880 Concrete Bonding Primer http://www.behr.com/behrx/act/view/products_detail?prodGroupId &catName=Specialty&catId"
Any experience with these or similar products? What works well and is reasonably low odor?
Thanks as always for any shared experience.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Todd H. wrote:

http://www.behr.com/behrx/act/view/products_detail?prodGroupId 8&catName=Concrete%2FMasonry+Waterproofers&catId
http://www.behr.com/behrx/act/view/products_detail?prodGroupId &catName=Specialty&catId"
Seems to me the Behr products are not at all what you need, since you aren't waterproofing the concrete. The etching product may be a good prep for another finish, though. IMO you have these choices: 1) A water based epoxy like the one Sears and others sell. I have this on my garage floor, and it''s pretty decent, but some Sears batches come with a sand non-slip that you may like to avoid. The included cleaner seems to work pretty well, too. Coverage of these per $ isn't all that great. Can be safely applied in a closed environment, though, but may need two or more coats.. 2) A better (my opinion) system is the conventional solvent based two part epoxy systems. Of course acid etch is recommended, but it isn't all that hard to do, just read and follow directions. One gallon of part A and one of Part B yield two gallons of paint and the coverage is what the label says. Sherwin Williams has a good product in their stores, and there are likely others. Best applied in summer with open windows and flame sources turned off so you don't have solvent poofs at a burner. The epoxies are noted for their tenacious adhesion to concrete, so they may also have some waterproofing ability. My oldest epoxy floor coating was a solvent-based done in 1975 and the parts of it not worn away by traffic still look OK. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would bet that most of the dust isn't from the concrete but it is from whereever dust comes from. In other words, everything. The dog, the sawing you do down there, the kids, the air blowing thru the sill plate area, etc.
Paint will work ok.
Beware the concrete etching stuff. You have to wear gloves working with it, and since you'd be spreading it on a wall, probably a waterproof smock and something to cover your face. Steer clear of this; I would use it only on the floor, and then only if you're going to use concrete paint or stain, whatever it's called.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.