reduce sound transmission between interior walls

I've googled this and all the information is aimed at soundPROOFING the walls. I'd just like to make a decent reduction in the amount of sound that passes through the walls.
The usual advice is the add another layer of drywall with some insulation between, put staggered studs so the wall board from one room does not touch the wall board in the other room, etc etc. All of these make perfect since and would be very effective at reducing the sound transmitted but they are major projects.
I'm looking for bang for the buck here.
Right now, I have two bedrooms that share a wall. One has my 1 year old light sleeper and the other my 3 year old noise maker (toys that play music and talk). Also both of these bedrooms share a wall with my living room where the TV is. To make matters worse I have some hearing damage so I need the TV a little louder than usual so I can hear what people are saying. Not blasting loud but I can't turn it down to whisper levels and make out all of the words.
The wall construction is typical with a 2x4 studs between two 1/2" drywall sheets.
Is there a product that can be blown into the walls through small (say 1-2")holes between the studs, in the top sil (non load bearing sil from in the attic) or the sheetock itself? I'm thinking of some type of blow-in insulation to reduce the sound from echoing in the dead space between the two sheetrock walls.
I've seen several say that when they remodel and put plain old insulation in there interior walls with nothing else special it made a notiable difference. I'd like to duplicate that except witout removing the walls.
any ideas?
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minimally expanding foam insulation worksa well, but is pricey.
it expands and seals air passages tht allow sound transmission. can easily be installed from indoors with small holes.
will provide much better sound deadening than blown cellouse, theb far cheaper alternmative.
perhaps it might be easier to move bedrooms?
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Foam might make it worse in some frequencies, its solid, it did for me and it would not be cheap. Cellulose would absorbe more sound. Cheapest to try would be hang decorative rugs on walls then blow in cellolose, then build out if that wont help.
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wrote:

A dense foam should help. Also make sure that you address any ventilation issues. If you have a forced or gravity air heating or cooling system, you will find that those ducts can easily defeat any sound insulation you add. You can address those issues, but just be forewarned that you will likely need that as well.
An additional layer of drywall will give you the most bang for the buck as it is cheap, but it will not be as effective as other measures.
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On Jun 2, 7:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hit a piece of foamboard even a foam cooler, sound resonates loudly. I put foamboard on my house, now when the neighbors walk upstairs it sounds like they are Inside my home. Certain lower frequencies are acentuated with foamboard. Drywall and wood dont resonate like foams.
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Yes. Lots of info at:
http://www.cocooninsulation.com
Got the machine and insulation at the Home Depot. At the time, if you purchased x number of bags, the machine use was free. I did quite a bit and it worked out well. Doesn't sound like you may use enough for freebie use.
I used a hole saw and kept the cutouts. Later I mudded them up and set back in the holes to dry very slightly recessed. Later mudded over them. BE SURE to prime these spots before repainting or you will end up seeing dull circles all over the room.
I don't know if insulating between interior rooms will alter the heating/cooling transfer.
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wrote:

I think you may spend a bunch of money and find that it only helped a little. You need hard solid surfaces to soundproof. That's why folks suggest drywall.
I know these ages can present some difficult sleeping challenges, but things normally get better over time. It's good to get them accustom to noises when they go to bed, otherwise you will spend your life tiptoeing around your house. Kids are really good at falling asleep when they are tired, regardless of the noises around them.
Take some walks after dinner, go to the park, run around, play. When you get home do the bedtime ritual, then read to them. Every night. Kiss them, tell em you love them and turn out the lights. They'll catch on.
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think white noise generator that masks other noises
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I agree with Bob on the white noise generator. We have a 1 yr old and he sleeps like a baby with his white noise machine and my 2 other children in the room next to his. Good Luck!

think white noise generator that masks other noises
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Loose-fill slag wool insulation.
Excellent Sound Absorption The fibrous structure and high density of rock and slag wool insulation offer excellent sound absorption properties, making these products an outstanding part of overall wall systems designed to reduce sound transmission.
wrote:

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mook johnson wrote:

Consider the sequence: * Excessive sound vibrates the sound-side sheetrock * The sound-side sheetrock transmits this vibration to: a: The air between the two layers of sheetrock b: The 2x4 holding up the wall * Both "a" and "b" transmit the vibrations to the quiet-side sheetrock and from there to the quiet room.
Filling the cavity between the two rooms may mitigate "a", but not "b".
I suspect MOST of the sound transmission is caused by "b", so filling the cavity will not be a perfect solution.
The BIGGEST "bang for the buck" is a set of earplugs. Fifty cents.
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mook johnson wrote:

Years ago, an architect told me about using lead sheeting inside walls to deaden sound. Lead sheeting should be available from roofing suppliers but it may be quite expensive. There is a material called MLV "Mass Loaded Vinyl" that is almost as good as lead.
http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/flooring.htm
TDD
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