redoing floor of fixing it?


Hi, . my wife and I live in an old apartment with wooden floors. The floor is fine for the most part but it has started to show its age. . the main problem we have right now is there are big cracks between alot of the wood slats - the cracks are very visible, and fill up with dirt. Also, the slats are giving in and make quite a bit of noise . landlord did some sh!ty work with putty that has cracked and creates a mess* . We would like to fill the cracks witha material that will not allow dirt to fall between the wood and that is durable and also looks good. . Both my wife and I have no problem whatsoever with doing the work ourselves. . what would you suggest? . lbrtchx
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I have heard of filling with fine sawdust and glue but have no idea what kind of glue. I bet there are others who will correct me.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I know of nothing that will work other than refinishing or replacing the floor depending on the actual condition.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Carpet?
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I just searched for the term bar top or bartop but then realized its from the rec.woodworking (the wreck) NG. May have more luck copying it over there too. I am not a chemist and do not know the answer on how to use this product in this context, nor any other answer.
(for OE) Edit, Find, Message..., "bartop" in Subject: OR Message: field
I just had a thought about drizzling it into the gaps before or at the same time as another coat of hard-surface (non-Spar/marine/floor) poly. One knowledgeable about chemistry would advise best method, however I would think avoiding extraneous sanding a priority. I have done poly floors like that with a lambswool applicator on a pole. Its like a mophead you wrap a lambswool pad around.
http://www.parish-supply.com/lambswool_applicator.htm

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This is expensive I would think, but poly would follow the contours of the cracks, whereas this may fill and bridge. The specific applicator like a modified plastic oil can or huge syringe, etc. may be essential, and timing, and amount. I wouldn't expect to be able to chisel/sand b/c damage to the surrounding area may be too dangerous.

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Or you could apply it first, then do ALL the sanding after it has dried, which may do something for you

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I think thats 2 words (bar top) in Subject: field
Its probly elsewhere in there too
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This may not be a "good" site, but its the first one I found when I googled "bartop epoxy". I'm not sure if all are epoxies. http://www.epoxyproducts.com/bartop.html

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http://www.leevalley.com/home/Search.aspx?c=2&action=n
These are good for finishing wood surfaces, as well as scraping old paint off, etc. The edge gets a burr, and its like dragging a chisel backward. You can get one at Home Depot, etc., but whether or not they are of any use b/c unsharpened is another story. The tool itself is a pretty specific piece of steel, and when sharpened properly you'll be the only guy on the block. Don't know if the ones sold at the link above come sharpened.
seldom would anyone have a high hardenable usable piece steel around their house they could use to "sharpen" one of these things. Defintely needas practice at that too. Do not expect to open and sharpen it for immediate use. Keeping these tuned is key. Inside the engine of a car in a piston wrist pin. The sharpeners sold here if interested is probly a good idea, make that definetely. Anyways these guys can answer your questions.
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this may sound strange but.. in northern new england they use a mixture of maple syrup & sawdust to fill the voids involved with wide/ knotty pine floors. it will harden eventually & still allow the wood to expand & contract, which the glue will not do. using glue will cause more cracking in the long run.
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I'm hoping my idea will get me into the tool of the month club
northern new england they use a mixture of

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this may also be better
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p2928&cat=1,42884
and item search flush cut. May be available from BORG.
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If you don't want to attract insects, you could use sawdust mixed with either polyurethane or glue. I have done small repairs using model airplane glue but would think either the polyurethane or either a water or solvent based carpenters glue would work. I would think that there are some commercial wood patching materials that would work even better.
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