Red Maple

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NO, just dying.
There was

Not only is the foliage dense, you are too. Re-read what you wrote and you'll have the answer. Meantime. park your car out of range.
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Well, that's rude. And here I was, Ed, thinking that you were a good source for intelligent information based on your previous postings. I suppose that does make me "dense" but not for asking questions, just for believing you might have something to say that I would want to read. Glad you cleared that up for me.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote in message news:mr2dnQk-

After thinking about this, I was going to apologize for not realizing you were joking in the original post. I see you really were serious.
In the past few months, the new has had stories of a person walking that was killed by a falling branch, people killed in a car when a tree toppled on them, houses damaged by trees falling, and a few other assorted tragedies.
You already stated the tree has leaned toward your house, that you see a crack in the moss, that you see another rotted spot, yet you still don't understand why the town wants to remove the tree. Sure it will be a loss of shade, of beauty, etc. but it will be a bigger loss if it comes down on your house, car, or family. Sorry to have offended you, b ut you really are not seeing the reality of the situation.
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wrote in message news:mr2dnQk-

believing
was
I know trees are dangerous. My secretary's mother was killed by a falling oak tree that smashed her car while she was waiting at a stop light.

Perhaps I should have stated that the tree has ALWAYS leaned toward the house and this was not a new symptom but was a reason to consider removing it now that other symptoms had appeared.

The moss was always slightly separated around the roots. Not being an arborist, I didn't know if this was normally "play" or an indicator of serious root rot. I know that big buildings sway, I assumed big trees did, too.

Correction, I just wanted to make sure that the tree really was a hazard and that there wasn't some other treatment might that could save it. I see now that it was the right call. I probably would not feel that way if the sawn sections had come down clean, without the ugly black stains.
Obviously I am not alone in my obliviousness because a lot of people get killed or suffer damage from trees they didn't spot in time. I suppose I owe my buddy a dinner for pointing out that the moss crack seemed to have enlarged. In reality, that was the only thing that really stood out as different. The other items I noted were long standing ones I mentioned just to be complete.

your
not
Thanks for apologizing. I am not an aborist, nor much of a gardener so I really didn't know which of the conditions I noted were fatal. As I noted, some of the conditions had been like that for over 20 years (the moss, the breaking off, the leaning towards the house and naturally healing limbs and a line where the root ball has pulled up slightly).
Until the tree was felled, I could not see how deep the rotten part was - at least a gallon of black, moldy ooze dripped out of the hole when that part was cut down and laying on its side. Coupled with the nearly full "leafing out" of the tree, it didn't *look* very different than usual.
The only thing that alarmed me was a visitor, during a strong windstorm saying "I don't think you should be seeing the roots flexing the dirt as much as they do in the wind." When the big branch fell during the storm, it was like many other big branches that had fallen before it (there are at least 20 such knotholes on the trunk - they're easy to count now that only the trunk remains standing).
The difference this time was that it was a "wye" branch that broke and it left a cup like, upward facing wound that collected water. In that sense it was very unlike all the other breaks which were much cleaner and usually at 90 degrees to the trunk. I think that standing water caused the rot to spread throughout the top of the tree, dooming it. Not sure if that could have been prevented by plugging the wound with some magic tree compound. I seem to remember in my distant youth people tarring places where limbs had dropped off.
After reporting the dropped bough to the city (for special trash pickup) and noting my concerns about the cracking in the moss around the base, the arborist came by, inspected the tree, marked it for death, and it's dead.
So I repeat, I am not an arborist, so I really did not think the conditions I observed were as seriously as you thought they were, especially since several of them were not particularly new events. If that makes me "dense" then so be it. I just wanted to make sure the poor dumb tree got a fair trial before it got the death sentence.
Woodsman spare that tree, touch not a single bough, in youth it sheltered me, and I'll protect it now.
I didn't watch Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoons for nothing, you know. (-:
I am just happy it came down without incident. If it had smacked into the house in a windstorm, it would have made an unholy mess and knocked out all my utilities, too. All's well that ends well, except for the poor dead tree. Of course, the wood's still out there waiting for another crew to pick it up and to remove the still standing trunk that's about 20' high. I suppose they know if they leave logs around that someone might relieve them of the need to dispose of them.
-- "HD" Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

Any power lines above? If so, may not be the city, may be the power company. A couple of years ago, they murdered dozens of lovely trees around this part of town because they were in their easement, and getting big. (Including some that pre-dated the power lines being there, and where the cable could have easily and cheaply been re-routed to a different pole, out of harm's way.)
If you can spare the cash, a second opinion from an arborist may be worthwhile. You probably won't win any challenge to the powers that be, but you will know if you were right or not.
--
aem sends.....

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in
removal,
<stuff snipped>

That's part of my concern, that they are chopping down something for reasons other than "inherent vice."

Fortunately, my neighbor already wasted her money on just such a challenge when she discovered what you already know: TPTB always win. And arborists aren't cheap!
Thanks for your input, it is much appreciated.
I will redouble my efforts to contact the aborist or anyone else that might give me relevant information. It's a big, old but beautiful tree and I would hate to lose it. But I think I would hate it more if it cut my house in two or smashed my car up. It's at least 2 feet in diameter at the base and could do some serious damage if it fell.
Do they always just remove sick trees or do they sometimes try to prune back the bad parts?
-- Bobby G.
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I don't know about red maples, but the ordinary street trees that look like maples have a maximum life span of 60-70 years. Given all the signs of disease, you probably have a tree ready to give the ghost. I remember vaguely, because it was talked about so much later on, that all the fruit trees in a part of Holland (Zeeland) inundated by seawater in February 1953 bloomed exquisitely that spring then died from the saline poisoning. Your tree may very well have leafed out (and you didn't say, bloomed tremendously) because it is dying.
--
Best regards
Han
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That's a good call. Well, it's not dying anymore, it's hunked up in sections lying on my front lawn, stone dead. )-: I had no idea that street trees had a limited lifespan, but it makes sense. They have all sorts of things to contend with that a tree in the country doesn't have to face. I am trying to recall whether it bloomed this year. I seem to remember a lot less pollen than usual, but that's a really subjective analysis. I'm afraid I just didn't notice whether it bloomed or not.
The saline story is interesting. I guess a tree's slow "metabolism" means that poisons take a long time to work their way fully into the tree. Up until now the only tree care rule I knew was that you don't change the level of dirt around the trunk of a tree if you want it to keep on living.
Thanks for your input!
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

<snip>
plants sort of know when they're checking out, and like men at closing time in a bar, will chose to go out with a bang (so to speak).
i have some 40'+ saguaro's that were felled on my property in a windstorm last winter. this month is flowering season for them, and the ones that are flat on the ground are chock full of flowers, even though they've a: been down for 6 months, b: have no roots in the ground, c: haven't been watered since they've been down and 4: are partially rotted and/or insect/packrat eaten already.

regards, charlie cave creek, az
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