Recreational Concrete Slab Query

My project is a 28' X 46' half court basketball court I want have poured. Please keep in mind I live in Maine a rather cold climate state.
(1) I am going to remove the top soil down approximately six inches. (2) I am going to set up my forms using 2" X 6's flush with the relative land surrounding the court. (3) I am going to lay 2" foam board issulation as a base which the concrete will be poured over. (4) I will use the appropriate amount of rebar and bricks to hold them the correct height. (5) I am going to have a professional come in to do the pour and run the boat float(?) to get a smooth playing surfice. (6) I am going to purchase red dye so the cement has a nice look I am thinking the rust red. (this will be poured in the Cement truck) (7) lastly I will surround the outside perimiter with 2' wide foam board buried beneath the top soil to prevent frost from getting beneath the slab.
I am sure there are steps i have left out like the hole that will be deeper where the inground hoop will be placed.
My questions are:
Do i need to go four inches thick? or would three be ok? Am I asking for trouble if I don't put down gravel? If so how much do i need? will I need to rent a tamper? How deep should the outside edges go? do they need to be on foam board? would six inches be enough? I would appreciate any input in any areas you feel I may be missing...
Thank you!
You have a great website!!!!!
--
Financer1983

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Why on earth would you insulate the slab? (Unless you plan on putting a shed there later or something.) The foam board will do zero to prevent frost heave. Heave results from inadequate drainage under the slab. A rebarred slab with adequate gravel layer and footings, probably poured monolithically, will be just fine. Your local concrete flatwork comany can give you the approproate slab thickness and footer requirements for your area.
This is basically a patio- pour it like one.
aem sends...
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On Sat, 01 Apr 2006 03:44:14 GMT, "ameijers"
-snip-

I wonder what it does do, though. I was driving a cross a bridge under construction today and they were unloading a truckload of blue foam. Do they use it for expansion joints?

Unless it is adjacent to a driveway, then treat it like a driveway because people *will* drive on it.
Jim
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2cents worth for free,
think michigan is pretty much the same for cold as maine - so that project for me, here would go like...
12" - 18" depth any less = no warrenty bottom / sides of excavation covered in landscape fabric (not plastic cheap stuff - fabric.) drainage system out of aggregate to daylight / drywell. 21aa limestone aggregate to 2" shy of aggregate grade - tamped per 4" cover with fabric. you want to end up with a completly socked aggregate base. builders sand to grade (bottom of slab) moisten before pour.
4" if no vehicle traffic is to be expected - 6" if so 6 bag fibre renforced concrete use coated rebar if possible no insulation CLOSED CELL POLY FOAM expansion joint material, not the oily stuff. (example: http://www.apscork.com/apscork/closedcell.shtml ) smooth trowel finish
apply color(s) of choice in a court paint, like Duracourt Tennis Court Paint, or equivalent. Stencils are available for correct markings if wanted. good luck and have fun.
advise worth price charged
Jim www.jlbuilt.com
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Don't forget to build in the appropriate slope for water to run off.

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