Recommendations for DTV conv. boxes

Can anyone recommend any of the DTV convertor boxes? I just got my coupons. Now I have to decide which box I want. I've heard some are not real good, and others are mediocre. I'd rather spend a few more bucks and get one of the best. I live in a rural area where there will not likely ever be cable in my lifetime, and satellite is way too costly.
I'd prefer one that allows the current channels (until they are gone), too. I heard that many do not.
Thanks to all
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I have the Magnevox (Wal-mart). I don't think it passes the analog signal but since all the stations are broadcasting digital I can't be sure. The digital signals are extremely good and I am now getting two channels that I couldn't get before. The only place where satellite is better is in the program grid. With satellite I can look ahead a week but I don't have that option with the digital TV. This may be a normal function with digital and not a fault of the box.
---MIKE---

>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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On Sun, 11 May 2008 16:58:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

I read a review that recommended the Radio Shack one (the other one reviewed had a label that began with a U, a name I was not familiar with) because the Radio Shack one had a nice interface that made it easier to use and apparently brought in the most channels.
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I just unwrapped mine I got from Circuit City. It is a Zenith (made in China) and it does not seem to do well on the cheap pair of rabbit ears I have. This however is not surprising as the rabbit ears did not do too well on analog either. My TV is the monitor style so I can use the direct audio and video connectors so I don't have to go through double tuners.
When I did get a signal however it was crystal clear, so I am hopeful that when I rig up the roof top antenna I will have a good selection.
I can get cable, but refuse to pay for TV that should be free.
I wish they had display units so you could actually see what the differences are between the units, but Circuit City only had one model and no interest in hooking up one for a display.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On May 11, 2:58 pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

You'll find a list of coupon-approved converter boxes here: https://www.ntiadtv.gov/cecb_list.cfm
The ones marked with an asterisk feature analog passthrough.
Not all analog channels are going away in February, depends on your location. Repeater stations and low-power stations are not required to stop broadcasting their analog signal in February. We have a cabin about 20 miles outside Flagstaff AZ. When the digital switchover happens, there will be about 3 or 4 digital channels available, and 7 or 8 repeater stations still broadcasting an analog signal that carry the Phoenix stations. So, we'll have a need for analog passthrough also.
Here's an interesting website that will tell you what stations will be available, and where to point your antenna for best reception. http://www.tvfool.com/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29 You just plug in your address or zip code, and you get a list of available channels, sorted in the order of received signal strength at your location. Interesting stuff.
Jerry
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On Mon, 12 May 2008 08:35:17 -0700 (PDT), Jerry

The thing I dont understand about this is that they say we can use our existing rooftop antennas, which I guess works since others are doing it. But HOW can that work when these digital channels are using a different frequency band? I know that the bars on an antenna are designed for different channels which is determined by their length, and the longest correspond to the lowest numbered channels (analog), and the shortest are the high UHF channels. So, how can they work for the new frequencies of DTV? Wouldn't there be a more optimal antenna design? I dont know the frequency band for the new DTV, so I am not sure how this works. After I get my converter, I will connect to my present rooftop antenna, but I'd like to get the most channels I can get, so if a new antenna is in order, I'll eventually buy one.
Dan
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On Mon, 12 May 2008 12:05:13 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

In most (possibly all) cases, they aren't on a different band.

AFAIK, there are no new frequencies in use. In this area, channels use the following (analog -> digital):
7(ABC) -> 10 19(CBS) -> 18 51(Fox) -> 31 54(CW) -> 38 (eff. next year) 56(NBC) -> 22
In no case is a different frequency band used. One is VHF-Hi, all others UHF.

DTV uses exactly the same frequency bands as analog, except for the exclusion of 700-800MHz (channels 52-69). Fewer than 1/3 of the channels are excluded.

Most DTV channels use UHF (now limited to 14-51). I used to think it was going to be all on UHF, but there is one VHF here (channel 10).

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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