reciprocating saw

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Know nothing about this tool but like to get one from what i see it can do. I would like to get the lightest weight ( which means most likely a battery one ) and prune some shrubs. I know there are pruners for this, but the branches are much thicker than a typical pruner can do. Someone mentioned a Milwalkee buzzsaw.
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Don't know what a milwalkee buzzsaw is.
You can get pruning hand saws.
Battery saws are not always the lightest because they have both batteries and a motor. Many do compensate for this with a smaller motor and ligher case. Personally I find the battery powered saws to be too weak and the battery run down to quickly to be of any use for extended work. I have one of the small battery circular saws and i's handy when you just need to make a couple quick cuts. But if I have a lot of cuts to make I get out the extension cord.
There are powered pruning saws. A "sawzall" with a wood blade would also do the job. And there are very small chain saws that go on the multi tool trimmer gas motors. I have one of those and I like it because you can reach up high with it..
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Having had both, I recommend Fiskar compound pruners. Unless you are taking down big limbs, then I would use a hand buck saw. The Fiskars have gears that multiply your effort, making it easier. The buck saws cut great. Be sure to cut the underside first on anything big so that it doesn't break off a strip of bark when you cut the top, and it lets loose.
Steve
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I am an 81 year old man and still handy enough to do chores, but i am looking for a product that does the work for me and not the other way around...the last time I used clippers on my aborvitae, i was sore for days...so i was looking for a power tool, just put it on the branch and let it do its thing. LOL
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-snip-

Problem with a power tool in shaky hands is they can do more damage than good in the blink of an eye.
For branches under 2 inches I'd be trying out some ratchet loppers. They don't need batteries or cords- they can get into places that power saws can't [easily]- and they aren't likely to takeoff the wrong branch [or body part].
If you can't handle them- maybe it is time to have someone else do that work for you. Do what you can without endangering yourself.
I know that's a hard choice because just last week I spent a lot of time trying to convince my 85yr old dad that *I* would put on the snow-shoes and rake the 3 feet of snow off the roof-- while *he*, with his relatively new artificial hip could spend the time behind his snowblower on more-or-less firm ground.
He *had* to try the snowshoes on and take a few step before he saw the wisdom in my way. No sense in hurting yourself when time is so precious.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

BTDT. The role reversal is a hard thing for both sides to handle. I still help my 83 YO father with projects when I am down there visiting. He is down to one useful eye, also has a redone hip, and can barely walk at this point due to a botched 'routine' spinal surgery. But he still gets out in his shop every chance he can. He saves the big stuff for when I am there, but I have to keep a close eye on when he starts getting shaky, and find some excuse to call for a break. After being the Old Man to all us kids for sixty years, he is finding it very hard to dial back.
--
aem sends...

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On 3/11/2010 9:46 AM, Anthona wrote:

like it a lot. Because it is battery, it's not the lightest weight unit. But, I do use it with a long "wet wood" pruning blade. My wife also uses it for light pruning on our property. It's much better balanced than the old unit I had which was a no-name china built saw. The blades change real easy without using a wrench or Allen wrench. It's also good for normal recip jobs. It seems to have plenty of power. I also have a small electric chain saw on a stick for higher pruning. It was from HD (I think) and works ok. The only complaint might be that it is heavy out at the end of the stick. I've used a similar gas unit (Stihl) with the engine at the bottom. I didn't like it because there wasn't enough weight at the top to push through the branch and it didn't have the reach that the electric one has.
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Ditto on the above only my battery sawzall is a Roybi...Even the wife uses it for pruning...I have the Black &Decker electric chainsaw on a stick for the high stuff and Echo gas chainsaw for clearing brush and small trees..Works good...HTH...
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Anthona wrote:

A reciprocating saw like a U.S. Marine. You use it when you have to destroy something immediately. It WILL work in your application and a few others.
I suggest the Harbor Freight MultifunctionMiracleTool - either the corded or wired model - which will do the job you have in mind and about 877 others. This tool, however, probably won't work too well on branches over about 4" in diameter.
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re: "I suggest the Harbor Freight MultifunctionMiracleTool - either the corded or wired model"
What's the difference between "corded" and "wired"?
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I heard of Harbor Freight but was told to stay away from them...their products are so cheap and wonder why....anyway I don't want to buy one for each season. In that case I might as well buy a more expensive one. I want the tool to do all the work and save my arm and back muscles that get saw after a long winter.
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Anthona wrote:

Shrug... Your loss.
At least 50 people on this newsgroup have bought the HF MultiFunction tool and are tickled to death with it.
If you don't like anything you buy at HF, take it back. I doubt there is any company with a more liberal returns policy.
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Well, can you tell me why their products are so cheap? Are they refurbished? Any how i just read their ad in my latest Reader's Digest and there are none close to me, so the coupons that are offered in the RD ad, are only for in store purchases to get some of those low prices.
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Chinese imports. You really don't know who is making what and they do sell a lot of junk.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

So what's the opposite of junk? Their MultiFunction tool is $40. The Fein equivalent is $400. HF sells a dozen 1" foam brushes for 98 - Home Depot sells them for $1.98 each. HF sells functional handcuffs for $4.95, Smith & Wesson offers theirs for $39.95.
My last trip to HF, I bought an assortment of 20 hose clamps for $3.95. They're $1.95 EACH at the auto store.
I guess the opposite of "cheap" is "overpriced."
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HeyBub wrote:

than price. They downside of the item failing far outweighs any savings. I've never seen handcuffs at my local HF, BTW. Or were you just tugging our chain?
Ya gotta walk into HF with your eyes open- some stuff is a great deal (like the same-as-Sears air compressors for half the price), and some is crap (like most of the precision hand tools.) But plenty of the stuff is 'good enough', at a very good price. And I love the free flashlights. I'd feel guilty not buying anything, so I am spreading out my buys of shelf stock consumables to make it look not TOO obvious why I am really there. (HF is half a block off my usual Saturday errand route...)
--
aem sends...

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How about electrical supplies? I've heard loads of stories about fake UL labels. HF GFCIs, anyone?

Agreed.
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aemeijers wrote:

The quality is virtually irrelevant on hose clamps and handcuffs (and totally off the list for sponge brushes!). I WAS mistaken on the hose clamp business: the set contains 40 clamps, not twenty. As an ex-cop, I can also tell you quality is unimportant in handcuffs. Heck, for rounding up herds of squints, we used cable staps! My HF does have handcuffs. It also has sextants. That may be because we have more goblins than you and sometimes have trouble finding our way.

Right. For the life of me, I can't see what could possible go wrong with a 4x12' canvas painting dropcloth for (regular price) $10. It sure can't trip a circuit breaker, leak, slip on a nut, or have a short battery life.
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As far as clamps go (of which you can never have enough) I just picked up 4 of the 12" bar clamps for 1.99 each, and I'll be going back for at least 4 more.
Are they anywhere as good as my Jorgensen bar clamps? No way!
Will they hold 2 pieces of wood together while the glue dries? Absolutely.
I'll use the Jorgensens when real clamping pressure is required, but the HF cheapos will serve their purpose also.
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wrote:

I've had a bunch of the longer ones break on me.

The rest of them might, but I won't trust them anymore without backup at the ready.
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