Recipe for one yard of concrete

I want to make a yard of concrete for a 9'x9'x4" slab. How much of each dry ingredient do I need?
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Paul wrote:

Look it up , there are several online calculaters .
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On Sunday, August 16, 2015 at 11:44:04 PM UTC-4, Paul wrote:

you will get a better job using sakrete, it has additives that help on a diy pour.
it will cost more,
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bob haller wrote:

It will cost a *LOT* more . And sakrete sucks , that accelerator makes the window to finish trowel very small . At 4 bucks a bag , you need like 25 bags to pour a yard ,
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So, $100 per yard for Sakrete.
How much for a yard of DIY mixer concrete? One were I buy the cement and shovel the gravel mix into a small mixer, myself?
How much for a yard of mixed, delivered by cement-mixer truck? Last I heard, it was $75 yard (in CA), but that was 15 yrs ago.
Not disputing yer claim, jes spitballing, as I may hafta go down this road in the near future. ;)
nb --now in CO
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wrote:

See above for a cost 10 years ago. It is more like 40 to 45 bags.
Bad thing about the mixer truck is that you need to order around 4 yards or more , or the delivery fees will ammount to about the same .
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Last sakrete I bought was 1.1cf per bag , divide into 27 (volume per CY) gives 25 bags ... which is actually close to the price of delivered premix . Cost me a hundred per yard plus a "small load delivery fee" when I poured my shop floor a couple of years ago .
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That must have been a big ass bag to have 1.1 cf in it.
Their website lists an 80 lb bag as only .6 cuft. You would have been buying about 150 lb bags at your rate. They only list 90 lb bags at the most and that is .66 cuft.
The 40 to 45 bags I used were either 80 or 90 lb bags, I don't recall which.
At that time it was about twice the ammount of the delivered concrete per yard not counting the delivery fee and additional charge for a small load.
To make sure we are talking about the same thing, that is the stuff that you only add water to.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Hmm , apparently I was misinformed by the guy at the lumber yard . I called recently , getting prices for the next phase of our home-building project .
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wrote in message

You can go here and do your own calculations. Just put in how large an area you are going to do. http://www.sakrete.com/products/calculators.cfm/selectedCalculator/Concrete#concrete
Maybe the lumber man was wrong.
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On 8/17/2015 10:27 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Sometimes it is worth the extra not to have to do the hauling and mixing. It is tough work. Some od the bigger cities have places that will deliver as little as a half yard by grouping drops in an area of the city.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

There is (or was) a place in Memphis that loaded concrete into little trailers (designed for hauling concrete) for small batch projects . Other places may have something similar for 1-2 yard projects .
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On Tuesday, August 18, 2015 at 8:03:14 AM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

or find another project or neighbor whoneeded concrete and combine purchase from a concrete truck. i have done that more than once
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I just priced Sakrete at about $150 per yard. 54 60# bags. $2.79 a bag. Menards. If you can truck ready mix in, or wheelbarrow from the truck, it's much cheaper - about $100 per yard - but you're going to run against minimums/delivery charges. I haven't had it delivered in many years, and the minimum then was 3 yards. That was what we needed for a patio, so it worked out. But you better be ready, and have enough manpower to work it, else you end up with a mess. When we did it I had to break up a mound of concrete that had set on the sidewalk because the truck won't go at your pace. They want to dump and get on to the next job. I try to forget that day, which happened to be the hottest of the year. I've used mixers, but found mixing in a wheelbarrow just about as easy to use for the small jobs I've done. I've made my own mix, and used bags of pre-mix. You have to price the materials and decide. That was all in my youth, and getting concrete workers was expensive. Nowadays workers are relatively cheap and I'd hire it out. Doing a yard or less, I'd still do it myself.
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It is more like 40 to 45 bags for a yard. I used that to do a yard for an antenna tower base about 10 years ago. Rent a mixer for about $ 45 from the local tool rental place and plan on spending arond 4 to 5 hours doing it. I don't recall the exect price,but counting the delivery of the sakrete, some rebar and 50 bags of the stuff it was around $ 200. More than a yard would have cost then, but I would have had to pay delivery fees plus they could not get a truck to where I wanted it at. I was not about to wheelborow the stuff about 100 feet on a sloping yard.
Bad thing about a small ammount such as up to around 4 yards is they are going to charge you for about that much by adding in delevery fees if you have the big mixer truck bring it to you. You may be able to negociate a price to have a truck to bring it to you at the end of another delivery.
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On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 03:44:01 +0000, Paul

Traditional sand - wet cast (approximately 1 cubic foot)
32lbs Portland (Type 1) 90lbs sand / aggregate 12.5-14.5lbs water (approx 1.5 gals)
1cuyd = 27 cuft
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replying to Paul, Paul wrote:

All these responses have been great and I think I know what I want to do and how to estimate the cost and ingredients.
Thank you all for your input. I think I have enough to go with now.
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