Rechargeable battery adapters


I got a portable radio w/ rechargeable battery that didn't come with the recharging adapter. The radio states to use a 6V 200mA adapter. How critical is the 200 mA value. I've other 6V adapters but all are > 200mA. Will it damage the battery or radio? Thanks
Steve 41N
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You could easily to up to 9 volts and 300-350 mA without over charging.
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Forgot to add-- make sure the polarity (i.e., is the center positive or negative) matches and is correct or you'll fry it in a heartbeat....
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wrote:

Put a 9v adapter in a device asking for 6 volts? That's asking for trouble.
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wrote:

No. An adapter with more than 200mA is like a bigger glass of water than one asks for. The battery will only use as much as it wants.
OTOH, I would hesitate to use a higher voltage than recommended.
And polarity is important, essential. I bought as a spare to use for other things a universal (multi-voltage, multi-plug) power supply adpater for digital video cameras. Other than cutting and reconnecting the wires, it has no way to reverse the polarity and for all the things I have, none of them video cameras, the polarity is backwards. I haven't been able to find out if digital video cameras actually have that polarity, or maybe that's why the charger were sold from a shlock outlet and not at video stores.

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You need the same voltage, same voltage type (DC vs. AC) and at least as much current. Having an adapter that can do more than 200ma is a good thing.
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Steve IA wrote:

Hi, If you have removable batteris, charge them with the battery charger RS sells. Having two sets of batteries will work better.
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Steve IA wrote:

The 200ma ought to be a minimum value. Of course it is possible that the charging circuit is so cheesey that the impedance of the dongle is actually what limits the charging current, in which chase the battery could overheat and leak, or even explode. So try it. If it works, you will have achieved frugality. If it doesn't, the thing was a piece of crap, anyhow.
Anthony Straight http://tonyelectric.com
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wrote:

Contrary to what others have said the voltage present at the radio could be critical. It depends on what is in the radio. Some IC's have voltage maximums that may be reached by some 7.5 volt poorly regulated adaptors.
A rechargeable battery should not be overcharged. Heat from overcharging/overvoltage will damage the battery. 7.35 charging volts is maximum.
A well regulated 6 or 7.5 volt DC adaptor of any current rating of 200 ma or above will work as far as the radio is concerned, but if you run into a poorly regulated adaptor the voltage could be 1.414 times higher than what the adaptor is rated.
If you have a few spare adaptors laying around first check that the marked ratings are at least what the radio calls for. Then measure the no load voltage to make sure it is under 8 volts for the radio or under 7.35 for the batteries. Even some 6 volt adaptors can measure more than 8 volts with no load.
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If you're recharging internal battery, the value might be important. Depends on the design of the radio. The 200 mA limit may limit how fast the batteries get charged.
If you're using the AC plug to run the radio (play music and news; not charging internal battery) then higher mA won't hurt anything. mA is power available, not necessarily power used. For example, you can plug a 1 amp table lamp into a 20 amp socket, and the lamp uses what it needs.
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