Recessed Downlighting for Kitchen

I want to remove the old tubular flourescent lights in my kitchen, and light the kitchen (ambient downlighting) with recessed lights. I do have access to the attic above, and there is insulation. I have an 8' ceiling.
I've been looking at the different housings, trims, and bulbs at the stores, and looking for information online. I'm overwhelmed with all the products, but underwhelmed with the lack of general information. I can find places to buy and product specs, but I don't know what to use.
I assume the most common size of recessed light is 5 inch. For my use, I'd get a housing for insulated ceiling. I guess I could get cans for non-insulated and push the blown in insulation back. Does it make a difference? Or should I just go with the safest?
Since I do have access to above the ceiling, I can use the cans with the joist spanners, but I could also use the can that are used for remodeling where you can't get above the ceiling. Does it make a difference? The cans with joinst spanners look to be sturdier.
How far apart should lights be placed? I like a well light space. I also like the higher K temps, but this may not be possible.) I know this partially depends on the bulb types and wattage, and trim, I use...
Bulb types...this is the most confusing of all for me. PAR is parabolic aluminum reflector? Does a PAR 30 mean the beam has a 30 degree spread? Are all PAR bulbs halogen? That is, are there incandescent PAR bulbs?
I've read that PAR halogen frosted bulbs eliminate hot spots and shadows that non frosted PAR halogen bulbs can cause. Yes?
BR means binary reflector? What's that?
Watt for watt, or lumen for lumen, do the non-flourescent bulb types cost about the same to run?
I've seen all types of trim. It appears to me that the most light would be gotten by using a trim that allows the bulb to be flush with the ceiling, rather than up a few inches or more into a baffle type trim.
I'd love to use flourescents, due to their low energy use, but I don't see this as possible with recessed lighting. Anyone aware of a modern looking flourescent type fixture, other than long or circuline tubes in enclosures that hang from the ceiling?
Is there anyplace you can direct me to learn more? I have looked quite a bit, and the more I look, the more questions I have.
Thanks, Bruce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use a sealed fixture for use around insulation or air will go up in the attic. Cans with spanners are usualy for new construction with above access either can be used. K is Kelvin,bulb temp or color of light Halogen are all about the same except the small mr 16 which are a bit whiter there are flourescent options which are ok in some areas but they dont reflect downward as well and for lighting counters are not as nice as halogen. Par 38 is bulb size most can be ordered in up to 5 different beam widths from wide flood to narrow spot. Box stores usualy carry only 2 variations. Flourescent put out 50 to 100 Lpw lumen per watt , Halogen apx 25 Lpw but it is directed light. For a bright kitchen keep a flourescent fixture or several and use cans. I just redid mine with T-8 dimmable 4 ft tube flourescent 3800k? and have the cans dimmable as well, there are times when you want alot of light in a kitchen and just cans may not do it. Go to a real light shop to see samples , people that know, all options available. Kitchens need alot of light you have alot of options and now dimmable flourescents
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce, go to a lighting showroom. If you have insulation, you should use an insulated housing, which reduces the wattage allowed in the fixture. Some brands like Halo allow you to adjust the lamp, so you can bring it down to the plane of the ceiling, which I find spreads the light better. There are fluorescent lamps made to resemble reflector floods, which are considerably less expensive to operate, but give less lumens and IMHO not a particularly comfortable light. At a good lighting showroom they can show you examples of the different lamp types as well as the placement data, then you can try to find a fixture that will accommodate the lamp type HTH

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bruce wrote:

Always use the safest!

I think I would use the remolding type.

The manufacture should have information on this. It depends on the lamp design and the distance between the lamp and the work surface.

PAR lamps are differentiated according to their diameter, which is measured in eighths of an inch. Therefore, a PAR64 is eight inches in diameter (64/8 = 8) and a PAR38 has a diameter of four and three-quarter inches (38/8 4.75). PAR lamps are available in an assortment of wattages and beam spreads as well. For example, a PAR56 lamp may be purchase at 300 or 500 watts, and each wattage is available in Narrow Spot, Medium Flood or Wide Flood.

Reduce is the word and they also reduce the dramatic effect.

Yes. There are some slight differences generally shorter lived lamps make more light per watt.

Yes, but then the lamp is more exposed and you may not like the potential glare.

There are lots of opportunities today to use fluorescent lamps in recessed lamps. Many of the new screw in compact fluorescent types will work in a recessed fixture. Look at commercial buildings, many use them today.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia\'s Muire duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.