recapturing dryer heat?

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Once in a while, I will vent the dryer into the house. I try to keep the lint dust down by covering the far end of the dryer hose with a knee high nylon hose. hth.... Linda H.
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wrote:

I usually do it when the humidity is really low. Sometimes, like the last couple of weeks, the humidifier just cant keep up.
Jimmie
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Well, the avg electric dryer is over 4,000 watts -- 4 kWhrs per hour of running time, which, at net NY rates, is about $1. If you could recoup 1/4 of that, you're earning 25c an hour.
--
EA



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Nate Nagel wrote:

Google for "dryer+vent+valve"
Here's one: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
When you start the dryer, you flip a lever and the dryer exhaust enters the room instead of being wasted outside. This has two advantages: You get the heat, you get the humidity.
On the down side, you'll have to put up with all the folks who will say "You're gonna die a horrible death, covered with fungating pustules and dripping sores!", particulrly if you have a gas dryer.
As for being inconsequential, not so. Thirty minutes of drying time will turn your utility room and anything nearby into a plenty-toasty territority, plus you'll be helping to save the planet.
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HeyBub wrote:

Been doing this for 30 years with an electric dryer. The heat and humidity are welcome. The lint is another story. In the basement it was not a problem. However, in a home with the dryer in the living quarters, you might want to do as this person says, filter the air to remove lint. But, you have to clean it after every use, just like the filter in the dryer itself.
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HeyBub wrote:

And all your tools in the room will rust out.
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Bob F wrote:

Ah, right. I should have said "fungating pustules, dripping sores, and rust."
Thanks for the correction.
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On 01/14/2010 09:52 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I have seen a commercial dryer heat exchanger in the past. I don't know if they still make them.
This is interesting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hilZKO-29VM

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wrote:

Gas vs Electric dryers are two different stories. Electrics can vent indoors with only the lint problem, we have been doing this for the 51 years we have been married. But gas presents a problem with the fumes and humidity combined. If it were my situation, I would just place a fan near the exhaust piping and blow air over the piping and recover a little bit of heat that way, but at a negligible cost.
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wrote:

Our electric dryer vents into the greenhouse during the winter, saving some of the heating costs.
Paul
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On 01/15/2010 10:33 AM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

An exchanger does not vent indoors. That is the purpose, extract heat and still vent outside.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

What "fumes?"
What's the difference between the output of a gas dryer and a natural gas space heater?
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HeyBub wrote:

One is designed to exhaust outside? The other may or may not be.
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One of my DIYer friends down in Ga. mounted a gutted out service panel on the wall above his dryer. Normally the air flows from the bottom back of the box through an HVAC filter to the front of the box and out the top to the vent.To dump the warm humid air into the house he just opens the door on it. I don't know if or how he provided for keeping the cold air from coming down the vent.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

Assuming he keeps the dryer door closed when not in use, where's the cold air going to go?
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Try putting on the clothes as soon as they come out of the dryer. The house may not be any warmer but you will be for a few seconds.
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