reasons Not to carry Gas Can in vehichle?

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On 02/26/2014 12:50 PM, micky wrote:
<sniP>

NO, it MUST be an approved container.
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Per micky:

I've done some pretty stupid things, but I think the stupidest one of all was when the fuel pump failed on my (1955?) Canadian Dodge.
Somehow I got a gallon or so of gasoline in some sort of container.
Then we opened up the hood and pulled the air cleaner off.
After that we drove through Waikiki and all the way home with Yours Truly laying across the fender, head and shoulders in the engine room, pouring gasoline down the throat of the carburetor with the driver sticking his head out of the window to see around the hood.
How I got this far is totally beyond me. Dumb luck, I guess.
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

What did you do with your legs?

It's incredible. Are you sure you're allive?
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Per micky:

IIRC, I has my feet on the front bumper, bent at the waist, and was laying diagonally across the fender.
But that was long, long ago and far, far away....
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

Absolutely illegal anywhere in North America for sure - and likely most of Europe too. Approved RED fuel container only.

Back in 1973/74, over Christmas holidays, I drove from Livingstone Zambia up to Lusaka, and from there to Ndola in the copperbelt, then up to Mbreshi at the nothern Zambian border in Luapula provinve. We had 2 jerry cans of gas with us, and never passed a gas station that had gas if the tank was below half full after crossing through the pedicle of Zaire, because you never knew here the next station with fuel would be. Would have liked to do a bit more touring around the lake country, but we only had those 2 jerry cans that we could depend on. We cut it a bit too fine - on the way back south we ran out of fuel just as we were approaching the village where we had bought our last fuel on the way north - and we managed to coast up to the pump - only to find they had run out of gas 2 days ago (likely hours after we filled up). Fortuanately we only had to wait a few hours before the tanker showed up to fill their tank, so we were able to fill the tank and both Jerry cans, and continue on our way (1967 Peugeot 204 wagon).

With EFI, the pump runs for a few seconds when you turn on the key, and then runs as you crank. Usually best to turn the key on and off for a few seconds at a time, several times, before attempting to start after totally running out of fuel.

shop that had not run for some time. (chevy 230 cu in six) It had a sticky intake valve. He was pouring gasoline from an open container into the carb as a student was cranking it over. It backfired, and he splashed burning gasoline over his arms and chest and also burned his face. He was off work for about 9 months - and I took over his position for the last six months of the school year (before leaving to teach trade school in Zambia)
With carbureted engines I used to have an old gasoline blowtorch - pump it up for pressure, then shoot a streem of fuel into the carb. If it backfired and lit, I just shut off the torch (turned the knob) and no more fuel to burn. Carried it in the old Power Wagon tow truck..
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Per snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com:

OK... my earlier reply about being doused with gas was out of order....
I'd like to hear some reasons about an empty too because I've always carried an empty 2.5 gallon gas container.
--
Pete Cresswell

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wrote:

it you might want to tie it to the back bumper and let it air out before returning it to the trunk.
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On Wed, 26 Feb 2014 10:15:06 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

As long as it never had gas in it, or was voided of all fumes; no biggie. To carry an empty can with fumes is more dangerous than a full can. Neither is recommended.
--

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety,
deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Ben Franklin
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On 2/26/2014 12:22 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Just the fire potential in an accident or the small if it spills.
OTOH, yhou are better not running out as fuel injected cars can be difficult to start if they run out. I try not to get under 1/4 tank so the internal fuel pump is also protected.
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injection. Mechanical injection like an OLD Peugot, or a deisel - that's a different story all together.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com:

I would expect to be doused with gasoline if/when I got rear-ended.
Anybody recall the Ford product where people were incinerated in minor rear-end collisions because Ford's accounting department decided it was cheaper to settle the lawsuits instead of spending something like $2.89 per vehicle to mitigate the hazard?
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 2/26/2014 3:45 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

with the side mounted fuel tanks.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
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On Wed, 26 Feb 2014 17:44:14 -0500, Stormin Mormon

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On Wednesday, February 26, 2014 12:45:25 PM UTC-8, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

UNSAFE AT ANY SPEED by Ralph Nader.
HB
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http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1971-1980-ford-pinto12.htm
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On Wed, 26 Feb 2014 19:08:28 -0800 (PST), Higgs Boson

No, that was the Chevy Corvair.
He's talking about the Ford Pinto. I thought they used the bottom of the trunk to double as the top of the gas tank. If so it made it much more likely the gas tank would rip apart. Wouldn't that save more than 2.89?

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wrote:

ender. A roughly $3.00 plastic sheild between the tank and the bumper reduced the risk several-fold.
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From http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1971-1980-ford-pinto12.htm
"Engineers found that the majority of the ruptures were caused by two factors: 1) the filler neck breaking off and allowing fuel to pour out, where it could be exposed to an ignition source; and 2) the tank being penetrated by contact with the differential mounting bolts and right shock absorber.
This is where a third successful fix had been devised -- a rather simple plastic insulator fitted on the differential that would keep the bolts from ever making contact with the fuel tank. Cost of this item was less than $1. "
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Now that's a classic!
--
Jax :)

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