Reasonable Cost?

Page 3 of 3  


Here is what he did, which I reported in an earlier post you may have missed:
The house was built 30 years ago, and the toilet had required no work during that time. One of the two bolts on the toilet which hold it down no longer was attached or firm at the end below the floor. When the toilet was removed it was clear that the original flange had just corroded away, and the hole into which the bolt head fitted was enlarged - so much so that the bolt head could not get a good grip. The old flange was removed, which was the hardest part for the plumber, per his comments. It was made of plastic and I'm not sure how it had been fastened to the upright pipe, which is also plastic. Eventually the old flange was removed. Another plastic flange was then inserted over/into (I couldn't see well enough to tell which) the upright pipe, and glued to it. Then new bolts were inserted into the metal ring that swiveled on the new flange. The toilet was lowered onto the flange/floor, with the bolts sticking through the holes on the base of the toilet. Nuts and washer were applied, and after some shimming to make sure there was no more wobbliness, and after ensuring that the toilet was oriented parallel to the enclosing walls, the nuts were tightened. Then the outside of the base of the toilet was caulked. (At some point in the above process a new wax ring was inserted - don't know its purpose but I understand it is a standard procedure.)

Yes.
It took him a good while to removed the old, corroded flange, and I'm sure he did it faster than I could have done. I wouldn't have even know where the flange stopped and the upright pipe began, so I would be very unsure of myself trying to remove the old flange.

Near the end of the job he made a couple of wedges from some scrap plastic to do just that.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

With the better explanation, I would say that he did actually do some work for the $250. But, as pointed out, you could have done exactly that, or maybe a friend who knows these things could have guided you through it, and you would have gotten off lighter. I am not in the habit of doing work for free, and I charge up to $800 an hour. I like to make $75 an hour from someone I don't know, or I'd rather be napping or fishing. But for friends and family, we make adjustments.
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.