really old phone lines

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On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 17:37:52 GMT, wendyhigginbotham_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (wendylee815) wrote:

My house (built about 1974) has 3 wires, red/green/yellow. It was probably just what wire the builder had. Unless you're on a party line, phones just need red and green (these connect to the middle 2 wires in the jack).
[snip]
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Radio Shack sold 3 wire phone cable at one time but a check of their site doesn't show it now. I think I actually have a roll of the RS brand 3 wire somewhere.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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I don't recall them ever calling it phone wire.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

May have something to do w/ the old Western Electric thing??? :)
In '78 the new house was wired by WE and the basement wasn't yet finished but was intended. The very kind installer left me an end spool of cable to use when I got the walls up. A number of years later there was a service call -- when I got home that evening, I noticed the remaining spool of wire had left w/ the telephone guy--still protective after all those years!!!
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I have had wire around when calling for service. I'd hide it (and tools too).
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Mark Lloyd wrote: ...

If I'd have thought of it, I would have, too...still ticked off about that one... :(
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AZ Nomad wrote:

Well, that's specific.
[8~{} Uncle Monster
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Probably intercom or thermostat wire. Given the source is Radio Shaft(sic), the former is likely.
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:)
JR

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On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 17:37:52 GMT, wendyhigginbotham_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (wendylee815) wrote:

More than likely, all you need are the green and red wires. The black and yellow wires would be used for a second line if you had one. In a normal residential system, they are not used, even though they may be hooked to terminals as if they are.
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A telco will NEVER use the yellow and black lines for a second line with a normal RJ-11 installation. Those are for lights and grounds in key systems, etc..
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 12:24:11 -0400, "TWayne"

You are wrong. This is very common in residential installations. People have a second line for the kids or whatever and it goes on the yellow and black wires.
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You can't read: READ what I said: "A telco will ... ". Using those wires for a phone line can of course be done. ANY wires could be used. But you'll never get a telco to work on them ever again; all they would offer to do would be to rip it out and replace it with properly wired system. Up your reading comprehension skills. Hell, I could use 10 ga green wires if I wanted to. But come back to earth Scottie.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 12:57:04 -0400, "TWayne"

You are still wrong. The telco uses yellow/black for a second line in residential installations. It would make no difference who does the inside wiring, as the telco would still be the ones to wire it THAT WAY where it enters the house. If you take apart any modern analog 2-line phone, you will discover that it is MANUFACTURED to expect the second line to be on the yellow/black pair. Gee, I wonder why?
Please also not that when JK wire is diagramed, the wires are labeled:
green =tip 1 red=ring 2 black= tip 2 yellow ring 2
Case CLOSED
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 13:02:57 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

That is what an RJ14 jack is labeled but when you use the yellow/black as the second line you get crosstalk. 2 line station wire will usually be blue/blue-white, orange/orange-white twisted pair. That really becomes apparent if you have a modem on one of those pairs. The carrier will bleed over.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 13:08:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

One more time. If a person calls the phone company and asks to change the existing extension phone in the upstairs bedroom of their 1960's raised ranch to a second line, the telco will come and use the existing 2-pair wiring and use the "unused" yellow/black pair for the second line. The assertion that telcos NEVER do this is pure unadulterated BULL-OH-NEE.
New installations are no longer done with JK 2-pair They now use cat 5. The OP has described the wiring in their new OLD house as being 2-pair with one of the second pair clipped off or missing. There is no blue/blue-white or orange/orange-white there. Does not exist. As I corrected stated, they do not need the black and yellow wires at all unless they want a second line. I told them they just need the red/green pair for what they asked about.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 13:27:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

The old JK only had 3 wires. The 4th (black) wire showed up with the Princess phone. As has been pointed out here, the yellow was for party line selective ringing.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 16:00:42 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The Princess phone was introduced in the late 1950's. So 4 wire JK has been around at least 50 years now. I personally know of several houses that have telco installed wiring from the 1940's that has 4 wire JK. In 4 wire (two pair) systems, the wires are named as ring and tip ONE and ring and tip TWO. If that's what you happen to have and you are on a party line, then, sure, use the yellow wire for selective ringing. That is NOT however it's official designation ever since the advent of 2-pair wiring - OVER FIFTY YEARS AGO.
Meanwhile, I answered the OP's question correctly, and corrected some misinformation promulgated by others.
See ya.
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No, you didn't.
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2008 11:08:45 -0400, "TWayne"

Really? So telling them that the only 2 wires they need to hook up their phone are the red and green ones was incorrect? You are beyond stupid.
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On Mon, 25 Aug 2008 16:00:42 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's what I thought it was for.
Also, I remember one house built in 1969 that had 6 wire cable:
orange orange stripe on white green green stripe on white blue blue stripe on white
The only wires connected were the 2 in use (I don't remember which 2 it was).
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