Reading glasses

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Some of us need to wear reading glasses to do home repair (thus why no OT in the subject line). My question. I can go to the optometrist and have all the tests taken and then get glasses costing hundreds of dollars. I can go to the drugstore and other places and get cheap reading glasses, but they are only sold in single diopters. i.e. 1.00, 1.75, etc. Why can't I find these cheap reading glasses that come in more than one diopter, like gradients from 1.00 to 3.00 in the same lenses, 3.00 being at the bottom of the lens and 1.00 at the top? Is there some sort of restriction on the sale of these glasses? Just curious, but maybe someone here knows.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 11/07/13 03:31 pm, willshak wrote:

Even with anti-glare coating, our glasses cost not much more than $100 at Costco. I think their vision tests are well south of $100 too.

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No restriction, they are made in both bifocals and progressive lenses. Probably trifocals too. They won't be cheap though and you won't (likely) find them at a drugstore.
https://www.google.com/#q=progressive+lens+reading+glasses
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On Thursday, November 7, 2013 12:37:31 PM UTC-8, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Roger that about Costco. If you're going to be doing a lot of DIY work, might be worth the (relatively) small investment for safety. You do NOT want any inaccurate vision when working w/tools!!
If you decide to go the Costco(or similar) way, get SMALL frames. That way, you can put safety goggles over them. Prescription glasses don't protect your eyes from bad stuff entering through side, top or bottom.
I don't get anti-glare coatings because they scratch easily. But you wouldn't need them for close work anyway; they're more for outdoor.
HB

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Is there a whole legion of optometrists dumb enough to put themselves out of business?
nb
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You don't need an optometrist to get supermarket/drurgstore glasses. Or dollar glasses. They're made far far away and you can tell what you need by trying them on. For me, less than 1.25 doesn't do anything, and while going up to 2 or 3 makes reading a trifle easier, they blur my vision when I lift my head and look across the room. 1.25 lests me look far away and still see almost as well as without glasses, so I don't have to take them off if I'm going right back to reading or close work.
Judge Milyan on the People's Court says she buys her glasses at the dollar store also, and I believe her.
I told my ophthamologist (that is, an MD) I bought glasses at the dollar store and he didn't say anything bad about that.
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On 11/7/2013 3:31 PM, willshak wrote:

Why can YOU get reading glasses, but I can't get distance glasses?
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Christopher A. Young
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On Thu, 07 Nov 2013 17:14:45 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Good question. No one sells really cheap distance glasses. I didnt' think to ask my ophthamologist, but someone told me it's because they are made in so many prescriptions. It may be true that there are more than for reading glasses, but I don't think it answers the question. They selll Duplicolor paint in more than 100 colors, 100's over the years. I don't see why they couldn't make distance glasses in all the prescriptions there are.
Do they need better fitting? Do they have to be centered in front of the eyes more than reading glasses. I don't see why.
Astigmatism. I've never understood how glasses correct for that, so nothing I say relates to that.
Cheap reading glasses always have the same strength in each eye. There are enough frame shapes that it would be hard to buy two pair and trade one lens. But even though one of my eyes is better than the other, this never bothers me Would it be a problem for distance glasses? You wear them. Do you know?
At any rate, I would think they could come up with a method to sell each lens separately and frames too. There is a lot of leeway between 100 dollars at a good store and 10 dollars at the drugstore.
This must be what I've been waiting for, a way to get rich. We just have to hire a company in the US or China to sell us frames and lenses for distance that fit the frames and we can sell them for 25 dollars. The extra 15 will include 5 more to buy them and 10 more dollars profit for us. We'll be like the first baker to sell sliced bread.
Let me see. This magazine has a house on a large wooded lot for $1,635,000. That's a lot for Baltimore. Now I think I'll be able to afford it. I'd like to close before the new year if you can get your act together.
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wrote:

Reading glasses are popular because of Presbyopia. Everyone will get it. It's worthwhile selling the glasses. The market is there. Not so for distance glasses.

I don't either.

Astigmatism is just an elongation of the lens, and is corrected with a similar elongation at a right angle to it. The glasses have to be custom ground for each angle (at 10deg increments, that would be 18 times the number of prescriptions - at 1deg that's 180 different ones), making off-the-shelf glasses impractical.

Shouldn't be. It's a matter of marketing. No market, no product.

Marketing. Fashion. Too many different combinations.

Already been done. Zenni sells prescription glasses for as little as $7. It takes a couple of weeks from China, but their work is good (the Optometrist I went to last time couldn't believe they were bought over the Internet). You'll need your prescription, though.

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On 11/7/2013 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I've got astigmatism and need bifocals. When I wore my Zenni glasses to an optical exam, I was 20/20 just like with local glasses.
As far as ordering from China, as some object, I've gotten one order in less than a week. I've also had a week's wait at the local opticians. Who knows where they are going to get the work done. Also pointed out the "Made in China" label on the local glasses. Even if the local guy did the lenses, he was using Chinese parts.
People buy American cars made in Canada and Mexico. Why not glasses?
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On Fri, 08 Nov 2013 09:05:41 -0500, Frank wrote:

I'll second that about Zenni Optical. Very cheap but great quality prescription glasses. You do need a recent (less than two years old) prescription from an eye exam. But you should be getting those anyway to detect vision hazards like glaucoma and macular degeneration.
In most states the doctor must release a copy of your prescription to you upon request. If he won't, Zenni will contact their office to verify the Rx.
In my case, I like to be upfront. When I make the appointment I tell the doctor's office that I want an exam for glasses, but I also tell them I won't be buying the glasses at their office.
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Tony Sivori

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On 11/8/2013 11:38 AM, Tony Sivori wrote:

I always get the prescription. A prescription for glasses is not like one for drugs where you need a doctors signature. Xerox copies or just giving the optician the numbers will get you glasses.
I see my ophthalmologist twice a year as my old eyes show signs of cataracts and macular degeneration. He also does the pressure tests. They will give me a new prescription when my reading of the eye chart changes. I have to pay for eye glass prescription but exams are covered by medicare.
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They ask for a date of your last exam but there is no way they can check it.

I have a pair from the optometrist (lenses every year and frames every other) but all of my spares and special purpose glasses come from Zenni.
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On Fri, 08 Nov 2013 09:05:41 -0500, Frank

Sure, I also have developed an astigmatism over the past few years. Zenni glasses have been great, though their frames are a little "cheap". I can't find lenses as large as I'd like, either, but they're not available anymore locally, either. I like large glasses for computer use, so I don't have to move my head to see the screens.

It's always taken the full two weeks, perhaps into the third. The local guys I go to grind their own, though my insurance won't pay for it so they order them from an optical lab. I'm sure the frames are Chinese, even though they're "designer".

People want to bitch.
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...snip...
I've heard of people that buy contacts but only use them in one eye. They say they can learn to read with the contact eye and use the other eye for everything else. They say "You get used to it."
I asked my eye doctor about it and he said, "Yes, that technique can work. However, if you want to do it that way, find another eye doctor. I don't support the practice."
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wrote:

During youth, I used to lie on my left side and read. With the book lying beside me, which resulted in the right eye becoming great at reading and the left eye wandering off, since it was so low to the book that it's view added little information, so as a result... The right eye became stronger and stronger for close viewing and the left eye became stronger and stronger for 'far' view. Rather unbalanced, but makes sense. If you don't 'think' about what your body is doing; it pretty much goes off and does what it wants. The attempted cure is to cover one eye at a time while doing the activity. Driving cover the left eye and try to drive with just the right eye. Reading, cover the right eye and force the left eye to try and focus.
All helps keep things from going wonky, but therein lies the truth, 'helps' not 'cures' Maybe a judicious regimen would work, eh?
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In article

My wife swears by them. I tried but couldn't get to work, largely because I have floaters. If contact in my floater eye, when they came around I couldn't read any more. If in my other eye, when they came around I lost long distance... rather disconcerting when driving. Had a friend do one eye long and one eye short when he had his cataracts done. He says, NEVER do that.
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wrote:

You do. Took me about 3 days. In reality, you are still using both eyes at any distance, just that one of them focuses sharply the other less so depending upon how bad your eyes are (mine were about 20/200). The fact that you are still using both eyes means you still see in stereo.
I've also done the same thing with glasses. I also did it with bifocal glasses. When I got so I needed trifocals I went to progressive lenses.
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On 11/08/13 07:12 am, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Because, I think, inappropriate distance lenses can do more harm than inappropriate reading lenses.

While I was still wearing contacts most of the time,* I had eyeglasses to wear at other times that the ophthalmologist called "monovision": one eye for distance and the other for reading. If that's ok for eyeglasses, I don't know why it wouldn't be OK for contacts.
*I had to have the contacts out for quite a while before my cataract surgery and have never gone back to contacts. IAC, one eye now needs only plain glass (except for the reading portion) and the other has a problem that the cataract surgery could not fix.
Perce
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I think they might be. When you use reading glasses, what you're looking at is pretty close, so the light is coming into your eyes from only a limited range of angles. With distance glasses, you might be looking at anything from zero to virtual infinity, so the more nearly the centers of the lenses match up with the centers of your eyes, the less distortion.

I've been wearing distance glasses for almost 50 years, and one of my eyes is considerably weaker than the other. When I was younger (and was still growing), sometimes there'd be quite a change when I got a new pair of glasses. The dizzying thing was that my eyes would suddenly both be "good".
Finally, the cheap glasses have cheap lenses. Chromatic aberration, fringes on the edges, you name it. That's not so bad if you're wearing them for a while and looking at a book or something, but every waking hour and looking in every direction and trying to use peripheral vision-- it's best to have the best possible lenses.
Cindy Hamilton
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