re-roofing an 8x12 shed?

After 30 years, the time has come to re-roof my 8x12 shed as there has been a significant leak that has developed. Having never done any roofing before, I'd appreciate suggestions as to the process through links, instructions, etc.
Also, since I won't have the time to re-roof for a couple of weeks yet, I'm wondering if I could apply roofing cement over the leaking area as a temporary solution. The area leaking seems to be affecting approximately a 6x12" area underneath.
Thanks, Jason
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You can use google to find many videos on youtube, etc that show the process

Yes, you can.
 The area leaking seems to be affecting

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On Wednesday, April 10, 2013 7:19:05 AM UTC-4, Jason wrote:

No.
Well, theoretically it will work. But human nature will intervene. You'll never get back to the roofing job.
What kind of roof? Standing seam metal? Built up? Shingled? Tile?
How bad is the sheathing underneath? Has the shed been re-roofed a couple of times, so there are several layers of shingle?
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If it is asphalt shingles, the instructions on 'how-to' are printed right on the bundles. It is not a complicated process.
Do take the time to strip off all the old shingles.
Harry K
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The only *slightly* complicated part is cutting the shingles for the peak. You need to do that angle thing so that it looks neat when you are done.
About half way down this site they show the proper angle layout for the ridge:
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/roof/maintenance/reshingle_3tab/asphalt/ peak_details.htm
Oh wait, maybe the OP will want to add ridge and soffits vents. He'll need to determine the proper square inches of intake vs. outflow for a 6' x 12' shed. There, that ought to get a lively discussion started. ;-)
Years ago, I came home from work and saw my neighbor and a few of his friends up on the roof of his house. They had already stripped off the old shingles and had started nailing down the new ones. They had just completed the first "course". I put that in quotes because they installed it *vertically*, from the soffit to the ridge. My neighbor saw me pull up and yelled down "How do I installed this next bunch without having a lump where they overlap?"
When I pointed out that shingles are installed in "rows" not "columns" he was pretty embarrassed. I went inside and grabbed a home repair book that had a pretty good chapter on roofing. I suggested he do some reading while his friends were removing the shingles that they had just installed.
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I can't believe it!! I had to look at your cite to see what you meant. I seem to have forgotten about those angled cuts in spite of having reroofed my garage, 2 sheds and a woodshed not all that many years ago. What good is a memory if you can't forget? :)
Harry K
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Others have pointed to the instructions. It's hard work but isn't difficult. An 8x12 shed should be easy enough.

A blue plastic tarp from Lowes of HF is a better bet. Weight it down with some 2x4s.
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Jason wrote:

No one has asked so far, so I will. What kind of shed are you talking about, metal, wood, or some other material?
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Ok, thanks for the posts so far. Just to update, this is a wooden shed with asphalt shingles. Someone asked what type of roof.... well, if you take an octagon and cut it in half and place it on the shed that's the kind of roof it has. So there are technically 3 peaks and none of them very steep. Yesterday, I temporarily patched up the area with a moderate quantity of roofing cement. After last night's rain, it seemed to stop the leaking.... for now. In a couple of weeks, I'm going to try and replace the roofing. Yes, this layer will have to be removed first as there is at least one rotten spot underneath and maybe others as well although it doesn't look like it from inside.
My biggest concern is what quantity of shingles I'll need and the best way to go over the peaks. BTW, it doesn't look like there was any drip edge originally although I think I'll install one.
Jason

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A "square" of shingles is enough to cover 100 sq ft of roof. Shingles usually come
I must be losing it. 8' x 12' = 96 sq ft which says that one "square" of shingles is all you ned. That can't be right as the normal 3 bundles of shingles is not going to cover that much roof.
Where is my error???
in 3 bundles per square.
Harry K
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I don't think you have an error, but is that 8 x 12 the size of the shed or the actual size of the roof ? Then you have to allow a few extra for the bottom run and the ridge cap.
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If you need two squares, buy contrasting colors and install every other shingle.
Should give you a unique shed look.
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wrote:

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On Apr 11, 6:10 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I would buy 4 bundles of shingles. You can always take an unopened bundle back if you don't use it. Just make sure that they all have the same manufacture lot#. This way they should match. You should be able to do this roof in a day. I did an 18x22 shop in 2 days. Just follow the directions on the bundle. On most three-tab shingles, 4 nails is sufficient. Unfortunately, when the city where I live, made me use 6 nails due to we are in a high-wind zone. Once you tear off the old shinges to the expose the sheathing, make sure you replace any rotten boards.Then start at the bottom and work your way up. Just make sure to stagger your edges.
Robin
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wrote:

Rent or buy a gun. You will never pick up a hammer again.
I got one on Ebay for about 70 bucks.
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wrote:

pitched roof.. Closer to 1 and a half square for the roof, and that may be a bit low.
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On Apr 11, 5:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

especially when allowing for the starter course and any ridge cap(s). Harry K
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Harry,

96 square feet is for a flat roof with no overhang, starter strips, or ridge shingles.
With a pitched roof you would have to calculate the total rise (squared) plus the total run (squared), then take the square root. Then add the overhang at the bottom, add the overhangs to the width, then multiply for total square footage.
Of course, on a building that size, it would be easier to grab a tape measure and measure the height and width of each side. I always get a couple extra bundles for starter strips, ridge caps, and to keep a few extras on hand for making repairs when needed.
Anthony Watson Mountain Software www.mountain-software.com/about.htm
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Jason wrote:

I don't know the part about how to go over the peaks.
But, here is how to figure the actual square footage of roof surface area that you have now:
Assuming that the shed is 12 feet long, and along the 8 foot ends the roof line goes up to the top of the roof and back down to the other side in 4 sections (two sections up and two sections back down) -- measure along the edge of each of the 4 sections, and add those four numbers up. For example, if each of those edges is 2-1/2 feet, the total of the 4 would be 10 feet.
Then multiply the total length of the 4 edges times the 12 foot length of the shed.
In the example above, that would be 10 feet times 12 feet, or 120 square feet of roof surface area. If the edges are each 3 feet instead of 2-1/2 feet, the surface area would be the 3 feet times 4 = 12 feet, times the 12 foot length of the shed = 144 square feet of roof surface area.
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