Re : Attic too small! Or is it? (Roof Raising/Dormers)

Hi all,
I currently live in a beautiful 1917 home and have been spending an inordinate amount of time rummaging about our unfinished attic.
It currently has a peak clearance of 78", which leaves it usable, but a bit too short for common occupancy. The roof has a pitch of 27 degrees.
Decreasing the roof pitch to 20 degrees in the relevant area will yield a usable space of about 8 feet width-wise, and 40 feet (the run of the house) lengthwise. Addition of dormers on the appropriate sides will further increase headroom and open up what might just be a terrific master bedroom with a view of Vancouver's harbour.
The real question is how much would it likely cost to completely tear down an old roof and put a new one up with adjusted pitch? The roof surface area is just about 1250 square feet, and we have high confidence the existing structure can support modest additional weight.
I find it surprising that all the places listed in "roof contractor" don't list approximates for full roof replacements, but only the surfaces. *shrug*
Replies gratefully appreciated!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What you're talking about doing is building a 1-story, 1000 sqft cottage. It just happens that you're building it on top of your house. It's not a roofing job, it's carpentry/remodeling. In any case, the price you get will vary wildly, depending on exactly what you decide to do, and who you get to do it, and what, if any adjacent bits of roof/wall there are to cope with, how hard your building is to get to, whether you want the house to look decent when you're done, and how much you piss off your contracter.
You aren't going to get meaningful prices by waving your hands. At the very least, we'd need a picture of your house from the outside, (front and back), and a picture of the unfinished attic space, pictures of your neighbor's houses, if any are visible, and a diagram with measurements of the rafters, beams (if any) and where the doors are supposed to go. And a copy of any relevent local building codes, including height/story restrictions.
--Goedjn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An architect's suggestions might help. TB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or a remodeller, or a construction contracter. But why would anyone chose the advice of a trained, licensed, insured, and/or bonded professional over anonymous kibbitzing on the internet? Don't be silly.
--Goedjn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ian:
IM> I currently live in a beautiful 1917 home and have been spending an IM> inordinate amount of time rummaging about our unfinished attic. IM> IM> It currently has a peak clearance of 78", which leaves it usable, but IM> a bit too short for common occupancy. The roof has a pitch of 27 IM> degrees. IM> IM> Decreasing the roof pitch to 20 degrees in the relevant area will IM> yield a usable space of about 8 feet width-wise, and 40 feet (the run If I'm reading this right you're basicly adding a second story to your home. Be cautious of local zoning regulations regarding a structure's height. We added a master bedroom over the dining room two summers ago and had to make some modifications because the City's regulations would not allow for the roof peak to be over so-many feet from groundlevel.
(View of the harbour, hmmm? I'm jealous!)
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
* Health Books: Exorcism and Acne
--
RoseReader 2.52 P003186
The Safe BBS Bettendorf, IA 563-359-1971
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.