RC spy car as crawlspace inspection device?

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>> you would have to crawl in and retrieve it.

a TV

out
and
good
midgets
no
Tell that to my Marine buddy and his son who went coon hunting near Quantico and ending up covered in ticks. Close to 300. Little things can hurt you just as badly as some of the big ones. (-: Squirrels laughed at my first attempts to screen them out of the attic. Now the vents are covered with 1/4" thick metal gridwork of the kind seen on metal stair risers on old front stoops. Apparently if the squirrels were raised in the attic, they want back in very badly and will chew wherever they can catch a whiff of their old haunts.

That makes sense. It also makes sense, as other have suggested, to have basement in an area with a high water table or in areas prone to flash floods. It's sound like areas without basements have some serious "other" issues to consider. When I see interviews with people in flood areas on the news saying it's their fourth or fifth total innundation, I ask myself "What does it take to get people to move to higher ground?"

Are basements really built outside tornado alley just to provide refuge? I wonder if it's a throwback to the days of root cellars and once the trend of basements got going it didn't stop - until it met areas where it was not a good idea.

Watching them would just encourage them. (-:

No, they're just the *gateway* to the end of the world . . . (-"

When you get to be as skinny as you were when you're older than say 50, it's usually not a very good thing. Be thankful for that fat. Well, some of it, anyway.

Mike Rowe was working in a damn tight space - so tight he was getting his butt snagged when backing up. It couldn't have been much taller than 12 or 14" inches worth of space. And all they were doing was inspecting and removing dead raccoon and skunk carcasses. Working under there just has to be grim. What I would worry about is how long it could take to get out of there if you had an accident, got some chemicals in your eye or whatever? Tank crews have a loop on their backs for quick extraction and they're not cramped at all compared to some crawl spaces. Of course, your average house won't blow a 100' crater if the stored ammo lights up accidentally.
-- Bobby G.
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-snip-

Anywhere the winters are cold cellars started as safe storage for edibles. Then when central heat came along [even if it was just a coal/wood burner in the basement under a grate- the cellar became heat storage.
One of the houses I grew up in had; 1. a furnace room 2. a coal room 3. a cold storage room
Another had a 1000gallon cistern in it. Both had parts of the house that were later additions with crawl spaces.
Jim
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On 11/6/2010 6:57 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Don't over-analyze it. Assuming you don't have a high water table, and the ground isn't full of rocks, basements are the cheapest square footage you can add in new construction. You have to put in a foundation system anyway. With modern digging machinery, the cost delta to dig a little deeper, and pour a little more concrete and/or lay another 8-10 courses of block, is trivial compared to the overall cost of the new house. Not at all like the old days when foundations were mainly hand-dug, and the dirt had to be hauled away in wagons if you had no place on the property to dump it.
IMHO, THAT is why basements became popular in the early part of 20th century. The fad started in urban areas, of course, because it made it a lot easier to hook up to city water and sewer, especially if they happened to be deeply buried on the street in question.
Of course, all of the above assumes the builder wasn't clueless about drainage and foundation sealing, or too cheap to put them in, figuring he'd be long gone. I've been in 1930s basements that were bone-dry and odorless, so they did know how to do it back then. I've also been in 1990s basements where mushrooms were growing.
--
aem sends...

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On 11/6/2010 7:26 AM, aemeijers wrote:

The last home my father and us boys built on the family farm, was dug into the side of a slope. One side of the basement is at ground level. I'm not sure if there is a specific term for that sort of construction but it has a spectacular view of the valley below since the house is only 100 yards from the top of the mountain. Dad wanted to build right at the peak but Mom wouldn't allow it because when the project was begun me and my siblings were little kids. There is a cliff at the peak with another spectacular view and it's a very long way to the bottom. It's a wonder any of us kids survived.
TDD
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On Sat, 06 Nov 2010 07:55:26 -0500, The Daring Dufas

It's called a walk-out basement or a "bank house"
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On 11/6/2010 4:48 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Cool! Now I know what to call it!
TDD
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wrote:

refuge? I

trend
not
That would be my guess on why they became so popular. Cities like New York, Boston and Philly were immigrant centers and any extra space built had the potential to be rentable. So as you say, the marginal cost of adding a basement had the potential to pay for itself with extra tenants.

Most builders do. (-: I recall seeing one house when I was looking for fixer uppers in the 1980's where the foundation consisted of bricks, bottle jacks and an odd assortment of other supports. I couldn't believe it hadn't been condemned which I believe did happen as soon as people starting looking at it and began asking questions about its ability to get a C of O.

Based on the number of basements in old houses I've seen in big cities, they are the rule, not the exception. As others have noted, once you got to areas where land was cheaper, basements made less sense.

That's an interesting thought. Some architecture student must have done a research project on American basements. Maybe I'll give it a Google.

Yep. There's been good work and bad work since the dawn of time. I would have like to have been there to see the look on the Pharoh's face when the first early step pyramid crashed under their own weight. It took them a while to realize that steepness had its limits.
There was a program on Nova just a while back on collapsing cathedrals. Quite a few of those toppled before they understood the dynamics of flying buttresses (which my nephew thought had something to do with fast, fat waitresses the first time he heard it).
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

I
trend
not
I grew up in a similar house, built in the 1880's. The coal bin eventually got replaced by a oil tank - no more shoveling!
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

The house I grew up in, the main basement was only just over 5 feet high, the cistern was out behind, and when we built the addition on the back in '64 it got a full basement under the part of the addition that was not over the cistern.
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Death by tick is a common problem for moose and other large animals up in Canada. We're talking thousands of ticks jes bleed the poor animal dry.
nb
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wrote:

Quantico
you
When I saw the extent of the bites I can easily understand how they could kill moose AND people. My bud and his son had built a blind and were sitting in it and said they felt little if anything as those suckers climbed up and hitched a ride. I certainly never felt the one that I found clamped on the tip of my you-know-what when I went to take a leak after mucking out a friend's stable. I imagine that when hundreds start sucking at the same time, enough blood volume loss can make some people faint.
My jarhead friend spent a few days taking turns with his son sitting in a bathtub of clorox solution. It was the only thing that even put a crimp in the itching. Now he's got to be innoculated for and tested and retested for all wonderful diseases ticks carry. This is the same poor guy who after pulling all the weeds surrounding his new home got the almost the worst case of poison ivy I had ever seen. His arms looked like bloody loaves of bread, the skin was splitting open.
After seeing that, even on the hottest days in the garden you'll find me in long pants, boots, long-sleeved shirts and gloves. I remember getting a bad case of poison ivy reeling in a 100' extension cord in my hands that had passed through a small patch of the crap as I pulled it in. The dose on my thumb was so high it left a permanent mark on the skin. That was the finger that wiped along every inch of the stinking wire as I reeled it in.
The worst case was a guy I knew was way back at school who used leaves to wipe his butt. He was enough of a naturalist to know what leaves were OK - except they were all entwined with poison ivy which he failed notice. It was rubber inner tube and screaming in the bathroom for a long, long time. Reminds me of the story of PT109 and how they were so thirsty one night that they licked the dew drops off the plants until to find out the next day they were covered with guano.
-- Bobby G.
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On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 23:27:24 -0400, "Robert Green"
snipped

Up here you need to get below frost for the footings. If you are going to dig a hole anyways, why fill it, when for the cost of a concrete floor you have doubled the floorspace of a bungalow, and increased the floor space of a 2 storey by 50%? It is the cheapest space you can build, when the hole has already been dug - and going deep enough for a 7 1/2 foot deep basement instead of a 4 foot one isn't much more expensibe if bedrock is not involved.
In the summer my basement is the coolest part of the house, and in the winter the warmest. It is fully finished except for the furnace room - and with the house being only just over 20X30 feet, the extra room is welcome.
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wrote:

"other"
the
I
trend
not
Further evidence supporting your theory is NYC. They blast six story basements out of the bedrock when building because land values are still ridiculously high and probably always will be. You can rent out parking spaces in the basement for incredible sums - at least they were incredible the last time I had to park in Manhattan ($500 a month in nineteen eighty somethings). They probably get $3K a month now.

I agree. That's why I'd pay a premium for a house with a basement although I must confess, my stores mostly junk since I live in one of those 100 year flood zones that now floods every 10 years. We had close to 12" of rain in ONE day:
"Places like Federalsburg, Maryland had to be evacuated when over ten inches fell in only 24 hours. Washington DC and Columbia, Maryland had similar conditions on June 25th, when seven to ten inches of rain fell in only 24 hours. Northeast Maryland, just east and northeast of Baltimore, experienced extreme rainfall on June 25th, when seven to ten inches of rain fell in only 24 hours. One of the highest rainfall totals in the entire region was at North Bel Air, MD, just north of Baltimore, which had nearly 12 inches."
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0QRF/is_6_48/ai_n16852983 /
That kind of water turns streets into waterways. I saw cars flooded up to the hood. I began wondering whether I should have built an ark in the backyard.
-- Bobby G.
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On Sun, 7 Nov 2010 22:08:04 -0500, "Robert Green"

Well, my house is built at the high point of the street, on a sandmound just over half a mile from the grand river, which would have to rize over 200 feet to reach my house. I don't even have a sump pump, or provision for one. The "T" intersection beside our house (we are a corner lot) has occaisionally filled withwater when the 3 storm drains all get plugged - usually with ice from snow-plough ridges, and we get a heavy rain/thaw. Only had a trickle of water in the basement once - before we replaced the rotted sill to the back patio door.
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Crawlspace homes are common in CA where it's not wet or damp. I went under mine to run some tv cable and was surprised at the total lack of most everything, even spiders. Jes dirt and wood flooring. Here in CO, it's similar. OTOH, I have an freaky aversion to spiders. The solution is cleanroom suits. When I went under our park model home to plumb a new sewage run, a cleanroom suit was perfect for the job. Kept me clean and kept the crawlies out.
I jes happened to have a couple, from working in clean rooms at one time, but "bunny suits" can be purchased for home use. I've found them as low as $8 ea. Since they are pretty tough, even the disposable paper suits, they can be reused a couple times.
http://tinyurl.com/2cm6ydt
You can get 'em as low as $5 ea if you're willing to buy a couple dozen. If I gotta go where the bug count ain't low, I'll gladly shell out a twenty for a couple suits and shipping. ;)
nb
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wrote:

In those cases it's not necessary. The ledge *is* the frost footing. Anchor to it.

Nonsense. As others have pointed out, you still need to get the foundation down below frost, so a basement is essentially free; just dig out a little more dirt (and often use it for fill on the same lot).

Ever notice how many of those are in the Southeast? No need for an 8' frost footing in GA. HGTV comes out of Atlanta, IIRC.

My current house (100mi from Atlanta) is on slab. About half around here have crawl spaces and basements are rare. The only house with a basement that we looked at when we bought this house was built into a cliff. It looked like it was going to slide down into the abyss any minute. A 20' high retaining wall was all that was holding it onto the hillside. OTOH, the real reason we didn't buy it was that SWMBO didn't like the kitchen. ;-) It had a 2300ft^2 unfinished basement that I would have *loved*.
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On 11/6/2010 12:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

UG! 2300sq ft, good size for man cave. 8-)
TDD
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On Sat, 06 Nov 2010 13:07:20 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Precisely! Unfortunately, I only got about 450ft^2 of unfinished attic and it's going to be tough getting the tools up there after it's finished.
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On 11/6/2010 4:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I suppose when you're married, you must make compromises to stay that way. I'm uncompromising, that's probably why I'm single. Of course the drooling and the crazy eyes may have something to do with it too. :-O
TDD
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On Sat, 06 Nov 2010 18:31:26 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Kinda. When we were looking for this house, we both had a "veto", which even a couple of years ago limited our choices considerably. I liked one house that had a 3-car garage, until I measured it. This one at least had some space that could be converted into a shop. I'll have to cut a hole in the garage ceiling to hoist the tools up.
After ~40 years at least the "drooling" part pretty much dries up.
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