Rayovac batteries - leak problems?

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On 3/25/2016 7:19 AM, Tony wrote:

IIRC, I had some Duracell D size batteries leak, new in the package. Quality of every thing is gone to naught. I've also had Rayovac D cells leak, also new in the package. And had Energizers leak. Again, new in the package.
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 08:11:25 -0400, Stormin Mormon

What was the expiry date on the batteries? How long past EOL were they? I havw a box full of cheap "Chateau" brand non-alkaline batteries that are over 5 years old (were leftover stock from a friend's "dollar store" that he closed at least 5 years ago) and NONE have leaked, and well over 80% tested fully charged when I got them a year ago. c, d, and 9 volt.
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On 3/25/2016 1:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Can't remember, and didn't take any notes. Sorry.
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 13:23:41 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Why didn't you take notes? Shame on you.
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wrote:

And filed them, carefully indexed, next to the computer, in case anyone here might ask. That's the least you could do for us. After all, we're all just trying to help.
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You know it's time to clean the refrigerator
when something closes the door from the inside.
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On 3/25/2016 1:26 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

Just cause I knew it would..... uh, don't want to ruin my reputation as a friendly and lovable guy.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 13:23:41 -0400, Stormin Mormon

It's been my experience "most" leakers are well past their "best before" date and/or have been left either significantly discharged or in high temperature storage conditions for some time. (or possible suffered a "hard freeze")
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 13:34:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I never knew freezing had any effect ? ? ?
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Silly cow!
I had brand new copper tops in a maglite. It was 0-dark-thirty and was jes below freezing and my maglite would not go on. New batteries and they were dead! ....at below freezing temps. I changed to Energizers and never had that problem again.
nb
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 14:32:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

From the "battery university" site Alkaline batteries are easy to store. For best results, keep the cells at cool room temperature and at a relative humidity of about 50 percent. Do not freeze alkaline cells, or any battery, as this may change the molecular structure.
From Energizer: 1. Is it a good idea to store batteries in a refrigerator or freezer?
No, storage in a refrigerator or freezer is not required or recommended for batteries produced today. Cold temperature storage can in fact harm batteries if condensation results in corroded contacts or label or seal damage due to extreme temperature storage. To maximize performance and shelf life, store batteries at normal room temperatures (68°F to 78°F or 20°C to 25°C) with moderated humidity levels (35 to 65% RH).
Notice the reference to "seal damage" - which can cause leakage.
From the tool Guyd site: In general, alkaline batteries perform very poorly in cold weather. As alkaline batteries are engineered with a water-based electrolyte, cold near-freezing point temperatures can lead to reduced ion mobility which slows down the chemical reactions that provide electrical battery power. This leads to a drop in performance, runtime, or both.
In some cases, cold temperatures can cause alkaline batteries to burst and leak.
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On 3/25/2016 1:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've found the heavy duty cells don't last very long -- in use, or in storage.
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 13:24:27 -0400, Stormin Mormon

In use they provide high current for a short time - not very good for low current use like electronics, but pretty good for high current use like toys and flashlights.
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On 3/25/2016 1:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The articles I've read say pretty much opposite of what you wrote.
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 17:36:33 -0400, Stormin Mormon

The "heavy duty" carbon zinc Chloride battery is a different animal than the old zinc carbon/manganese dioxide LeXlanche battery and puts out about 3 times the capacity, longer life, and less likelihood of leakage
They have a longer shelf life, but a lower output/in-use life than alkalines.
I've found for things like flashlights that sit most of their life but need to work when you need them, Carbon/zinc chloride batteries are best. For things that are used every day - low current/light duty use like clocks and remote controls alkalines are better.
Just my experience. And yes - a fresh alkaline will outperform a fresh "heavy duty" battery when it comes to hours of output from a flashlight - but put that flashlight away after half an hour of use and go back to it a year later - - - -
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On 3/25/2016 8:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Again, that's backwards of my experience. I've found, and read, that alkalines have much higher capacity and much longer shelf life. One time for some thing to do, I did mix and match alkalines and carbon zincs. I found alkalines last four times longer. Both in low and high drain applications.
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2016 09:21:13 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Well I have a big box of "heavy duty" batteries that have been "on the shelf" for ofer 5 years and are still in perfect operating condition......
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On 3/26/2016 1:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If they are (which I doubt), it doesn't prove anything.
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On Sat, 26 Mar 2016 16:46:39 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Except it disproves your assertion that they don't last long in storage.
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[snip]

"heavy duty". One of those phrases that used to mean better. Now it's on the low end.
BTW, I remember the "king size" soft drinks from the sixties. 10 ounce bottles, smaller than the regular ones now.
There's also "deluxe" in the name of cheap junk.
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On Fri, 25 Mar 2016 10:44:01 +0000, Raymond

Strange thing is the only "brand name" battery I have had leak at all in the last 10 years was a "coppertop". Just a wee bit of green/white fuzz on both ends. No swelling - and easily cleaned up.
The secret, I guess, is to NEVER leave batteries in anything un-attended for any lenth of time. I also had a set of off-brand original equipment batteries in a TV remote leak. The TV is 4 years old and one day the remote (used daily) just stopped working. I pulled the batteries and they were both leaking (again- just a bit of green/white fuzz on both ends) Both sets of leakers were aaa size.
I've also had a couple of coin batteries "leak" the same way. All have been at least 3 years old.
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