Rat trapping trick

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Courtesy of A&E's "Billy the Exterminator" (what does bug killing have to do with the "arts"?)
He was hired to kill rats in a Louisiana soup kitchen. The situation was SO bad that giant cockroaches were eating the peanut butter off the traps before the rats could even get to them. His solution was to put glue traps for the roaches on either side of the rat traps and then to screw a drywall screw right above the rat trap which he smeared with peanut butter. The roaches apparently can't climb out on the screw to reach the bait. The rats avoid the glue traps but have to stand on the trap treadle to get the PB. SNAP! I smiled when I saw that he used just what I do to trap squirrels - a family sized jar of peanut butter. He also wraps the trap treadle in bologna
Next day there were dozens of rats in the traps flanked by even more cockroaches stuck in the glue traps. I don't know what you N'Owlin'ers feed them, but the rats were as big as squirrels and the cockroaches the size of mice. He ended up with a trashbag FULL of rats.
I've seen lots of rats in my time but these suckers were ENORMOUS. I remember going behind a local supermarket late at night looking for cardboard boxes when I was moving. As I drove up to the dock, there were dozens of pairs of tiny little rat eyes reflected in my headlights, looking at me. I decided I'd get boxes somewhere else. And shop for food somewhere else.
Now he's fighting bees in short sleeves, attaching something I've never seen before (a bee box) to a hole above the front door where they're getting into the house. He's gotten stung so badly he's fallen off the ladder. It may not be art, but I guess it's entertaining! (-:
When I had a bee problem, I used a leather jacket, two pairs of pants (stiff new blue jeans and sweat pants over them), and a "bee hat" I made with some Fiberglas screening and an old ball cap. I still got stung, but I could tell by all the torn-off stingers I found on the outermost layers I wore on top of it all that I would have been stung a dozen times or more without it. If I had to do it again, I'd get a Tyvek bee suit. They also had an interesting portable sprayer that looked a little like a leaf blower they used to blow eugenol into a bee-infested dead tree. If I ever have another serious bee problem, I might modify a leaf blower to do the same.
While Billy wasn't wearing a bee suit, in the background of one of the shots showing him pulling this huge hive out of the foyer ceiling you could see a cameraman suited up from head to toe in a bee suit. At least someone on the set had a brain. On a later episode they used half a bee suit (upper) only. That made them half-wits instead of witless! The bees very quickly figured out Billy's fashion faux pas and stung the living daylights out of him from the waist down.
Bobby G.
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wrote:

You dont need all of that to handle bees if you do it the right way. Just dust them with Sevin dust. You can blow it right on them and it doesnt bother them. The bees will take it into the hive and kill the whole hive in a couple of days.
Jimmie
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<stuff snipped>

from
<<You dont need all of that to handle bees if you do it the right way. Just dust them with Sevin dust. You can blow it right on them and it doesnt bother them. The bees will take it into the hive and kill the whole hive in a couple of days.>>
I'm guessing that professional exterminators need to show their clients faster progress than that. For home use, it sounds just fine. Personally, my feeling is that if you're getting close enough to dust them, you're doing it wrong. (-:
How do you apply the dust?
I wonder if they've studied the attack profile of bees. They seem to go for the face and head first. It seemed to take them a while to go for the legs of the guys wearing the half bee suits. I know once they've stung you, they release a chemical scent that acts as a homing beacon for the other bees. There should be some chemical that you can smear on a "strawman" dummy to make them sting that instead of the person doing the removal.
I learned why smoke mellows bees out - they go into a 'save the honey' mode because they think it's a forest fire and they overload themselves with honey so much they can barely fly, let alone sting. There's a lot of programming in those little bee brains.
In one house they drilled into the ceiling and drained two buckets of honey from an enormous hive. The entrace to the hive was a white fascia board that had been stained black by the comings and goings of thousands of bees.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote in message

Like this:
http://groups.google.com/group/misc.rural/msg/95161c507175473f
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wrote in message

If only I had some firecrackers. I wonder if I can use some blanks, a pistol and the condom method to inject the powder into a wall cavity? Load a length of PVC pipe with Sevin and use an air compressor attached to one end to drive it out?
The last bee problem I had was solved with 4 or 5 cans worth of Raid Wasp and Hornet killer fired into the hole right under the roof where they were flying in and out faster then jets out of JFK. Even those damn bees came after me and I was 15 feet or more away from them. I guess they know if there's trouble and they see a human around, it's a safe bet the human's the cause. (-: I'm just not sure the bees I've had trouble with would just sit there and take it if I dusted them with Sevin. They seem to sting people just because.
-- Bobby G.
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The most effective, and probably most dangerous, is throwing a cup of gasoline on the nest. I didn't do that, but watched the critters fall straight to the ground, no flying, no swarming, DEAD, straight to the ground. Then, watched as the nest was scooped up, and burnt.
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On 2/22/2012 8:31 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

that is the method i use around here. Sometimes applying it with the one gallon pump sprayer.
--
Steve Barker
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Rat traps that are hung inverted, so that the rat has to reach up to the bait work very well. They can be fastened to any surface, and work best if they can not spin. I have caught trap smart rats like this. Put the trap as high as you think they can reach, so they have to get up on their toes to reach. They will grab the trip bar for stability.
Steve
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figured
doing
for
they
mode
honey
bees.
<<Bees wont bother you unless you bother them
I'm not sure all of them know that. (-:
<< and they dont seem to be bothered by blowing Sevin their way. Ive turned them white with powder and they just sit there. same for hornets and wasp. Sometime I get right up on the nest with a cup full and sling it on the nest. Ive been doing it all my life since I was a kid. Used to sling it on wasp nest. The next day I would collect the nest and use the larva for fish bait. I have a garden blower I use for getting wasp out from under the eve of the house>>
Thanks for the info. I might have to get some Sevin for the next invasion.
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote:

The first rat I ever saw was when I was a little kid. It was a dead one in some woods, a true giant. For YEARS I talked about the size of that sucker. Then I saw an opossum.
--

dadiOH
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How big was it? http://www.jdjournal.com/2012/01/09/bronx-foot-locker-boasts-giant-rat /

At least you haven't run into a capybara- [have you?] http://acidcow.com/pics/4769-the-world-famous-capybara-caplin-72-pics.html
Jim
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dadiOH wrote:

A few years ago, I trapped a 17-pound opossum who was depleting the outside-cats food supply. My son had a vet appointment for an ailing kitty, so I accompanied him, opossum in tow.
When I walked in, I asked if they could clean the teeth of my pet opossum. This request caused not as much confusion as you might expect inasmuch as the vet crew was familiar with me.
Only the two vets and one assistant had ever been this close to a opossum. The other five folks had only seen pictures.
Everyone gathered 'round the critter. He hissed.
"How cute!" said one of the (female) techs.
He hissed again and bared his teeth.
"Look at his itty-bitty teeth!" said another (female) tech.
"I have know opossums," said one of the vets. "Nasty creatures."
Everybody thanked me for a Jack Hannah moment. Mr (or Miss) Opossum was relocated to the vicinity of my local city councilman's house.
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Last year I trapped a racoon that was eating my cat food and had ripped open a bag of dog food that was in the garage. We assume he was getting in through the cat door in the garage.
Even though I only saw the one, I had rented the trap for a week, so I put it back out the next night after animal control relocated the racoon and returned the trap to me.
Later that evening I delivered the neighbor's very unhappy cat to his front door, still in the trap. He laughed. The neighbor, that is.
The cat bolted out of the cage as soon as I had to door half way open and hid in a back room for a full day.
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wrote:

Last year I trapped a racoon that was eating my cat food and had ripped open a bag of dog food that was in the garage. We assume he was getting in through the cat door in the garage.
Even though I only saw the one, I had rented the trap for a week, so I put it back out the next night after animal control relocated the racoon and returned the trap to me.
Later that evening I delivered the neighbor's very unhappy cat to his front door, still in the trap. He laughed. The neighbor, that is.
The cat bolted out of the cage as soon as I had to door half way open and hid in a back room for a full day.
*****
I caught my own rotund dog in my trap. I had it set for squirrels, and I guess she liked peanut butter. She didn't like it, as it was not enough room to turn around. She wasn't in there long, luckily. Now when it's out, she looks at it, then looks at me, then looks at it like, "Don't worry. I'm not going to do that again."
It was a bit of work to open the door with her fat butt in the way.
Steve
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Robert Green wrote:

Gravity can be your helper.
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Not when they've jammed themselves in so hard that you can shake the open trap vertically as hard as you can and the little SOB's are still stuck. BTDT. Both large racoons and possums have squeezed themselves in so hard their fur pops through the grid in a waffle pattern. I guess they are used to crawling into some pretty tight spaces with the probability that they'll always be able to back out.
The racoons, no matter how tightly they're jammed in there always exit as soon as they get the chance. Opossums on the other hand have had to hosed out and pressed out. As the other poster noted, they seem to want to make the trap their new home.
Even when any other creature would have left the trap under their own power, the opossums lingered until they were forced out. Brute force is not something I like to do with critters that size (~20 lbs) that emit green stinky goo when the fire ("the fire" is memory loss code for "they're afraid"). )-:
It's a pretty safe bet they're going to whiz on you or worse. Two year old tom squirrels with gonads as big as their heads can squirt some foamy noxious ooze that probably is great for attracting female squirrels but no so good for getting on your clothes. I'm sure the reason squirrels haven't been hunted to extinction is that they probably taste as bad as they smell. The dog likes the scent, though. She'll lick and sniff every wire of the empty crate when I bring it into the house.
-- Bobby G.
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-snip-

Skunks are in no hurry to exit, either. I'm not sure if the Fischer or the cats have been the quickest to exit.

I just prop the door open and come back in an hour or two.

You've got to stop bring crap into your house that doesn't belong there.<g> I shoot the damn squirrels right in the trap- rinse it off with a hose and catch another the next day. [woodchucks are a little more wary]
Jim
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Robert Green wrote:

"Learning experience?" Sometimes it's something else.
I recall in the days of my youth being on a Boy Scout camping trip. A 'diller wandered into the camp site and several of us gave chase. The critter scooted into a tent and thence into a SLEEPING BAG containing one of our fellow scouts!
Our supine scount awoke due to significant clawing on his lower legs and, in a fit of adreniline-fueld strength, RIPPED the sleeping bag open! He was bleeding from multiple scratches and covered with green armadillo effluent.
There was nothing for it but to put the sleeping bag in the fire. As for the mentally shattered scout, after hosing him dow with ice-cold water, one of the advisors bundled him up and took him to the emergency room for a tetnus shot and a mental health examination.
The armadillo scurried off into the night.
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of
Out of the frying pan, into the fire. Having had a squirrel in the "relocation program" escape his carrier inside the van, I can sympathize with that scout. Being inside any sort of closed container, van or sleeping bag, with a terrorized critter doesn't often lead to a happy ending. Before perfecting the cattle prod technique for interdimensional transport, one squirrel that I didn't realize was soaked with car starter spray ether I used to keep him sedated, ignited into a huge ball of fire when given the coup de grace with the prod. After that I modified the prod so that the probes fit through the trap wire mesh and ether wasn't required.
My New Englander wife told me that soaking a cage full of rats in gasoline and setting them on fire was a popular technique with Boston industrial arsonists. They would use live traps to acquire a dozen or so and then soak their fur with gasoline. Within seconds of being released (on fire) the rats would scurry to the far corners of any building they were released in, creating multiple points of ignition and leaving very little obvious evidence for arson investigators.

in
effluent.
Armadillos shoot green goo, too? Boo! Just more to be thankful for - we don't have skunks OR armadillos around here. Hope it stays that way although my wife tells me that we've been upgraded (downgraded?) to a different and warmer climate zone for growing in the last ten years by the Department of Agriculture. Our heating bill is less than half what it was last year. Hopefully this summer the cooling bill won't be twice what it was last year. Hopefully the warmer weather won't mean that creatures that plague mostly the warmer southern states won't be moving north. The very warm winter we've had has already had critter consequences. Stink bugs are all over the place which is very unusual for February.
Saw another good exterminator trick tonight: the exterminator used rotting food he food in a dumpster in the rat-plagued area as bait claiming that they are much more likely to go after "familiar" food that his normal peanut butter bait. In this case it was old beef jerky. Every trap had a dead rat in it. He claimed the job was done, but I wouldn't make that assumption if every trap was filled. I'd guess that there were still more "customers" who weren't able to find an empty trap. I'd consider the problem solved when most baited traps came up empty, not after the first round of baited traps came up 100% full. At least these rats (in downtown Chicago) didn't have giant cockroaches stealing the bait before the rats could get to it.
After collecting all the full traps with his bare hands, all the while talking about the diseases they carried, he cordially shook the hand of his female client. Ewww! Also him go after the worst bat infestation in an attic I have ever seen. The guano in the attic was several inches deep and the bat piss was leaking through the ceiling of the living room. There were 100's of them in the attack in a number of different "colonies" at the peak of the roof and all along the eaves. They relocated them in a rather arduous process. I would have gone for the shop vac . . . Beneficial or not, I don't live in their homes. I expect reciprocation!
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

I "catch" a possum in my trash cans pretty frequently. I just let them go. They aren't hurting anything. I was trying to trap a cat with a big live trap. I got 3 raccoons and a couple possums. One of the possums just started living in the trap, even sleeping there with the door open. I gave the trap back to my neighbor.
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