Rat and Mice Posion Recommendations

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Hi, mice or rats have burrowed under the front porch concrete steps. What can I do to get rid of them? Any recommendations for poison?
Thanks
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Any available rat poison will do the job. The stuff I buy comes in little packets so you don't have to handle the poison. Dont put it right in the middle of their tunnel since it might spook them. Rather dig a small hole off to the side with a trowel. Insert poison.
Poison is just plain mean. I only poison when there is damage to a building or if they get in the house. I don't like to use it but I do since it is the most effectve method.
What type of problem are they causing? Have you seen any in the house? If they are not in the house and are not causing an actual problem then you should consider leaving them alone. After all, you can't poison every mouse in the county and when these are dead others will move in soon enough.
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wrote:

Somehow they are getting into the house and nesting in the ceiling. I warm weather they stay outside.
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Mike wrote:

Place an outdoor bait station baited with any bait block should work fine. Keeping stations baited outside can help reduce the outdoor population which as it grows can become the indoor problem later.
Lar
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I'll pick up some next time I'm at HD.
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Dog food.
There should be a lot available at big discounts now.

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Mike wrote:

It's not always "Better Living Through Chemistry."
Think cat.
Check out "Towser," the mouser-in-chief at the Glennturrent Distillery. Caught 28,989 mice (plus a few rats and an occassional rabbit) in her 23 years of service.
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HeyBub wrote:

Along with countless numbers of song birds and small reptiles...sometimes it best to try a more selective approach.
Lar
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Lar wrote:

I can find no report of Towser ever bothering a songbird. It is admitted she sometimes captured a pheasant. As for reptiles, that would be a plus - unless, of course, you wanted to kiss each one first in the hopes that it might be a princess.
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HeyBub wrote:

Towser hunted mice inside a distillery. You had suggested using the cat for an outside problem, where song birds will be found. There are 75 million pet cats in the US and supposedly the majority of them are allowed outside so if just 37.5 million of those cat only caught one bird a year that would be over 37 million birds killed annually. Not to mention the millions of feral cats to boot. ---Instead of a princess I'd settle for someone to clean up the cat crap out of the flower beds.
Lar
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Lar wrote:

Ah, okay. Except I'm not sure regarding the part about Towser hunting inside a distillery. It would be difficult for a rabbit or pheasant to get inside....
Nevertheless, songbirds are a menace and should be culled. The world is still worried about Avian Flu breaking out and killing 20% of the population and songbirds are an obvious vector. Besides, they make an awful racket.
If someone wants a songbird, they could get a canary.
As for 37 million birds killed annually, that, regretably, is only a drop in the bucket. And it's only the dumb birds, who don't know how to avoid cats, that get caught.
And regarding the cat poop, it's not necessary to remove it from the flower bed. First, most cats cover their deposits. Second, cat poop (unlike dog droppings) IS a useful fertilizer.
Feral cats, I admit, are a problem. With enough diligence, feral cats CAN be eliminated as was done during the Middle Ages when cats were thought to be the familiars of witches and handmaidens of Satan. 'Course this led to the rampage of the Black Death - spread by rodents - and the death of 30% of the population.
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wrote:

Why is there a difference? Why isn't dog poop good as fertilizer?
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mm wrote:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandgarden/ygbriefs/h238manure-dog-cat.html
'Course the author is an alarmist regarding cat deposits...
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wrote:

Thanks.
Good to know.
I tend to a friend's golden retriever for 2 or 3 weeks every year, and after I fixed my fence several years ago, I stopped walking her and just let her use my little townhouse end-of-group yard.
I avoid the deposits for weeks or months, until the rain or snow makes them disappear, and there are no pregnant women here or kids, so I guess I'm pretty safe, but based on this webpage, I'll continue avoiding the stuff not just for aesthetics but for health.

The other choice is to go outside my yard and then apparently I'm supposed to pick up after her. If she were only a smaller dog, maybe. But I don't know how to make her smaller.
BTW, she doesn't obey me as much as she used to, and I gather it might be because I don't walk her or exercise dominion over her. But the convenience, esp. in the winter, of just opening the door and letting her go out, is worth it. I wish she would spend more time outside, enjoying herself, but she usually is ready to come back in as soon as she is done. This time I'll walk her more because she's too dumb to get exercise on her own. The yard is small but it would be big enough for her to run around in. Although when I walk her she finds terrible things to eat.
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mm wrote:

Terrible for you and me, lovely for a dog. A dog's digestive system is completely unfazed by biological nastiness. The canine's stomach fluids are made up of digestive liquids approximating fuming Nitric acid.
My granny used to describe something otherwise indescrible in its unusual awfulness as:
"Something the cats drug in the dog wouldn't have."
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?Although when I walk her she finds terrible

thats the trouble with poision, mouse eats poision gets ill, dog sees and eats mouse, now dog is ill, big vet bill later your lucky if dog is OK.
Outside people should leave wildlife of all types alone.
indoors is different.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

An animal will need to eat 5%-10% of it's body weight in the common rodent toxins before treatment is considered advisable. For a 25 pound dog that would be eating 20-40 one ounce bait blocks or 56-112 mice that had just been feeding exclusively on the rodent bait.
Lar
--
to email get rid of the BUGS

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doesnt take that much to make a dog or cat ill.......
take a klook at all the recalled pet food, the amount of rotecide appeared small, it was hard to detect yet its kiiling animals nation wide
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you take another look they are now saying the poisoning came from wheat glutton tainted with a plastic additive called melamine in concentrations as high as 6.6%. If it was the rodenticide as first reported, not sure it would still be accurate to compare to the commonly found rodenticides used by the public here. With aminopterin not being registered to be used in the US I can't say if it is an acute acting toxin or not.
Lar
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Cool but I'm not home very much and don't want a cat to have free rein (read destroy) of my place.
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