Range clock - Disconnect it!

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On Sun 01 Jun 2008 01:48:42p, Anthony Matonak told us...

That's only half of the reason to leave it connected. Most modern ranges have an electronic clock combined with the controls to set the temperature and turn the oven on and off. You disconnect that and you won't ever bake again.
Now, if you range is 30 years old, that's another story (usually).
Apart from the clock/timer on a range, most other "always on" devices have a reason for always being on. If unplugged or disconnected, you generally have to reset all the options every time you plug the device in. Good examples are VCR and DVD recorders, coffeemakers with programmable cycles, almost anything that stores settings.
Yes, you're paying for the convenience of using that energy, but it's terribly inconvenient if you don't.
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Wayne Boatwright wrote: <snip>

poor
reason for always being on. If unplugged or disconnected, you generally

poorly designed
device in. Good

poorly designed
VCR and DVD recorders, coffeemakers with programmable cycles,

in volatile memory instead of the correct way
. <snip>
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On 6/1/2008 3:09 PM CJT spake thus:

Right. Can you say "NOVRAM"?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

efficiency switcher instead of the cheap walmart class junk currently in use.
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I think if we all disconnected all the lights we have that run 24/7 and all these little clocks that we could make as much difference as AlGore does with his global warming theories. If anyone is concerned about how much electricity their clock uses, contact me, and I will send you a quarter for a year's usage.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

Hmm, I see you've snipped all context to make your point.
The real point is that phantom power loss is not negligible and accounts for 5% to 10% worldwide. Higher in more developed economies. Many appliance use more power "off" than on (collectively).
Now, you will probably object to any regulation that would level the playing field and require all manufacturers to reduce phantom drain. And that's a real shame as the technology already exists and the return on investment is quick.
You can't consume your way out of every problem. You certainly would rather do nothing about global warming. It's funny how some people can deny the human component of global warming and yet have no problem with the rationale of going to war in Iraq.
Also note that I've never advocated removing the clock from the range.
Jeff

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Uh, cite? No, never mind, the above statement is just pure BS.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standby_power
From the US department of Energy:
"Many appliances continue to draw a small amount of power when they are switched off. These "phantom" loads occur in most appliances that use electricity, such as VCRs, televisions, stereos, computers, and kitchen appliances. In the average home, 75% of the electricity used to power home electronics is consumed while the products are turned off. This can be avoided by unplugging the appliance or using a power strip and using the switch on the power strip to cut all power to the appliance."[4]
It would seem the only government office you believe in is the OVP.
Jeff

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Doesnt say anything like your stupid claim at the top.

Or that you have never ever had a clue.
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Rod Speed wrote:

75% is more than 25%.

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That aint the % the original stupid claim was made about.

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CJT wrote:

You are arguing with someone who would rather hurl insults than ever give a reasoned argument.
There's better things to do with the few minutes of your life than to waste it on Rod. It's not about right or wrong, it's about the futility of arguing with an intractable and simple mindset.
Take a few minutes to read his posting history and see if he doesn't belong in the killfile, not that I advocate killfiling but Rod makes such a good argument in favor.
Jeff

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That is not the same as "appliances use more power 'off' than on." The power usage rate is certainly less during standby than during regular usage. Duty cycle of off time vs. on time can certainly mean that an appliance *may* use more energy over time during standby, but only because it is in standby for much longer periods. When dealing with kitchen appliances, the standby current is very low relative to in use current because most kitchen appliances tend to be fairly big energy users. I doubt the LED clock on my stove uses as much energy in 1 year as one burner uses to boil a pot of water in 5 minutes.
The big hits on standby power are going to be VCRs, computers, TVs and the like. Those tend to not use a lot of power when in use, so the relative difference between standby and in use is not as much to overcome.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote:

All true but it's still hard to believe the "average house" over 75% in standby, even for electronics. Maybe I have a hard time thinking that because I'm sure my house is far below average in numbers of these devices so I suspect my estimate of "average" is skewed as compared to the sample mean.
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Yeah, I find that a little hard to believe too, but I only have one TV in my house. So, I'm probably not "average" either in that regard. In my kitchen the only things that use any standby power are the stove, microwave, and coffee maker. The coffee maker has a couple of LEDs that stay on, pointlessly, all the time but it certainly uses more energy making a pot of coffee in the morning than those LEDs use the other 23.5 hours of the day. The same goes for the microwave and stove clocks. The microwave has a clock display that I disable mostly because I don't need 4 clocks in my kitchen, but I'm sure the clock circuit is still running and it just doesn't display the time. The stove and coffee maker both have clocks which can't be disabled, but again, any one of those use more energy in daily usage than the standby uses the entire rest of the time, by a wide margin.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote: ...

The problem w/ the coffee maker we currently have is it thinks it has to get a second fill ready to brew any second so preheats the other water w/ no way to disable this "feature". Not only is it a power waster, the water level is always low from boil-off so have to add extra to compensate.
The microwave is combined in the range so nothing additional there and it's mechanical display w/ no processor boards, there's a clock radio w/ its display, but that's it for electronic gadgets in kitchen.
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That's not what the article said. This is: "In the average home, 75% of the electricity used to power home electronics is consumed while the products are turned off."
That's not saying that 75% of the total electricity use in the home is used to power electronic equipment on standby. It's saying that 75% of the electricity used to power electronic equipment -- which is surely only a fairly small fraction of total use -- is consumed while the equipment is on standby. Seems reasonable to me.
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Doug Miller wrote:

That is what I inferred, if you'll simply read what I wrote, but my incredulity still exists as noted even for that mix...
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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote:

That isnt relevant to the total power use of the house tho.
And is dubious with some of the home electronics like TVs and computers, which just happen to be the main uses of power in the average home even with just the home electronics.

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TVs and computers are the main uses of power in the average home? Only if the "average home" doesn't have refrigerators, clothes dryers, air conditioners, furnaces, etc.
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