Range clock - Disconnect it!

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The clock on my range has never kept correct time, yet it keeps running and using electricity. (Small amount, but many little things like this can add up.)
So I pulled my electric range out from the wall, unplugged it, and disconnected the clock. (Only do this if you know what you are doing.)
I already have many electronic things on power strips and turn off the power strips when not in use. These things use electricity all the time...
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Bill wrote:

Savings? Bah. Now you'll have to buy your wife a watch.
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HeyBub wrote:

Watches are pretty much out of vogue as most people check their cell phones fro time. It looks like you'll have to buy her a new cellphone for kitchen work.
Electric consumption of any clock, sans lighting, is nearly negligible. Certainly compared to a ranges power use!
Jeff
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Now.....you be SURE to disconnect the fridge lights, oven light, and rip out the range hood while you're at it.
Never knew about power strips...anyone care to dispute that?
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I think he's talking about electronics plugged into the strips, not the strips themselves
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Just don't turn off a power strip that has a desktop computer plugged into it. The power supply provides +5V Standby to the motherboard's RTC (real time clock) and CMOS RAM (which holds configuration data). When the computer is unplugged (or during a power failure) the small, non-rechargeable, lithium coin cell battery, maintains the RTC and CMOS RAM. Often these are soldered in, not in a battery holder, and difficult to replace. These batteries are not intended to supply power to the RTC and CMOS RAM for long periods of time (unlike computers of 15 years ago where the power supply didn't provide any power when the system was turned off, and they used a much higher capacity battery).
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wrote:

Some computers (including the one I'm using right now) still have hard power switches that turn everything off (electrically identical to unplugging).
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My computer has an Asus A7N8X-E "deluxe" motherboard for the AMD "Athlon XP" processor. That is maybe 5 years old. I got it the same day I got a "3200+" processor. The battery is removable and replaceable. I have that computer on a power strip that I often turn off.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On 6/3/2008 5:34 PM Don Klipstein spake thus:

Similar story here: I have a Tyan Trinity 400 MB w/Pentium, about 8 years old, that I turn off & on daily. It has never lost CMOS data, not once. (And yes, it has the newfangled type of on-off switch, ACPI, all that type crap.)
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Don Klipstein wrote:

Asus is a top of the line motherboard, so you'd expect them to have a replaceable battery. The boards sold for use in name brand computers are decontented to save ever penny possible, literally (I used to work for a very large Taiwanese motherboard company's U.S. office). This includes using a very low capacity back-up battery, and soldering it in.
Remember the large rectangular Tadiran batteries with a wire and a connector used on old AT motherboards? They used these because the battery had to power the RTC and CMOS for long periods of time because when the power was off there was no +5V to power the RTC. The ATX supply changed all this. There were other reasons as well. With the ATX supply, there is power to the PCI slots so you can do remote power-up through the network (though with most boards these days the Ethernet chip is on the board, and can be powered directly with standby power).
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There's very few motherboards from anyone that dont have a replaceable battery now.

None of those have soldered in batterys now.

But dont have a clue about whats happened since then.

Bet you cant list even a single example of one of those with current motherboards.

Nope, they didnt use coin cells because they couldnt provide enough capacity for the older RTC and CMOS.

Wrong again. The real change was the current used by the RTC and use of flashram that takes no battery current for the settings.
ALL modern motherboards get YEARS out of the replaceable battery even if you unplug the system from the mains when you arent using it. And it costs peanuts to replace when that is necessary too.

How odd that that wasnt eliminated in the cost cutting too.
You've never had a clue about the basics, which is presumably why you got the bums rush from that importer.
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I've seen a lot of motherboards, and I can't remember ever seeing a soldered in battery.
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Bob F wrote:

Hi, Some has soldered ones. Any how they last quite long time. On mother board there are two time functions. One real time, one is watch dog timer.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Bob F) says...

Back in 8088 days, motherboards often had a rechargeable battery soldered in. Solid state circuitry was not as efficient back then, and a motherboard clock would quickly discharge an alkaline or silver button battery.
Slightly earlier than that, there were no motherboard clocks. If you wanted a system clock, it was on an expansion card.
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SMS wrote:

Those little cells typically can power the clock and CMOS for a heck of a long time; I wouldn't sweat it.
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He didnt say that the power strip itself uses any power, just that he uses power strips as a convenient way to turn off what isnt used all the time, most obviously plug packs/wall warts that so many of the smaller devices use now, and other stuff that isnt normally turned off when not in use.
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Rod Speed wrote:

It's sort of hard to believe that it wasn't keeping correct time. Was there perhaps a "cook timer" function operated by a little knob in the center of the clock face? That's where the one on our stove's clock is, and if you don't do the cook timer setting function correctly you can advance the time on the clock.
Plus, you can't set the clock "backwards", so if you advance it say 10 minutes by clumsy setting of the cook timer the only way to reset the time is to crank the minute hand around almost twelve rotations, someting SWMBO never sees a need to do.

Some power strips do use power. To light up the little pilot lamp which indicates that the strip's switch is on.
I wonder (but am too lazy to calculate) how long that light would have to be left on to add a penny to your electric bill. <G>
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

I think it'll light for a year on about a penny.
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