Rain damaged sheet rock - repair or replace

I have a home in Dallas Texas whose rof has a leak and damaged multiple areas of sheetrock in the ceiling. This is the third time this area has been repaired by the home builder. The home is currently 1 1/2 years out of warrantly however the last repair covered under the warrantly for the roof leak was <1 year ago. The sheetrock in the ceiling is stained and remains damp after 1 week of air drying and fans. I cut out a large area to aid in the drying process. My question is that the homebuilder wants to simply dry the sheetrock and resurface the ceiling instead of cut out the damaged area. I normally would insist that he replace these areas but am unsure if his solution is reasonable. My only fear is the ensuing argument over whether or not they will cover the repair under warranty being that it was never correctly repaired (4th time this has happened in same exact area) with their last attempted repair 11 months ago. Any suggestions?
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Pay for independant advise, obviously he isnt fixing it right and most likely is not now going to do it properly. Most likely the correct way to repair the leak is extensive and expensive. Get your advise and go to small claims if it cant be done right. Oh the drywall, I cant see it from here. Id be more worried about rot and mold in the attic.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You may want to ask about your state's lemon laws with regards to new homes. You have an ongoing problem that could easily escalate into a mold problem. You should collect your papers on the warranty work and repairs to date, along with your photos, and ask consumer affairs or whomever handles such things in Texas, how to deal with the situation. A lawyer is also a good idea, but that will certainly raise the hackles of the builder and pretty much force a lawsuit. You may have no choice.
R
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Clearly this problem is bigger than the drywall. You need to leak fixed properly, then the proper repair made. Almost certainly that will call for new drywall. I like both ideas suggested. You are going to need some authoritative help to get this fixed right. Checking with your local (state?) authorities may be a good place to start. If you can't find anything there, I would suggest a local attorney. This could be an expensive thing if you let it go.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Focus on fixing the roof, and fixing it right. It doesn't matter how the sheet rock is repaired if the roof is going to leak again. Once the roof is supposedly repaired, put a garden hose or sprinkler to the roof to test it for leaks.
On 30 Mar 2006 19:44:19 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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