Rain bypassing gutter

I have fairly new gutters and they are not working. The rain runs between the house and the gutter. I have verified that the shingles overlap into the guttter, but the water sticks to the bottom side of the shingle instead of dripping into the gutter. The water runs underneath the shingle back towards the house and runs between the house and the gutter. In some instances the water accumulates above the soffit at eave vinyl. I am concerned this will rot the roof.
I already have drip gaurds.
Any ideas on what to look for? or how to fix it?
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On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 22:59:35 -0700, dmhamilt wrote:

By "drip guards" do you mean those things which keep debris out of the gutters?
If so, my experience is that during heavy rainfall water flows too fast and the caps prevent all the water from getting into the eaves. Light rains aren't a problem since the flow of water off the roof is less.
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On Nov 2, 1:59 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sorry...I don't have a solution but if you live somewhere where winter is really winter, I'd also be very concerned about ice forming under the shingles and allowing water to get into the roof, walls, etc.
--Jeff
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On Nov 2, 1:59 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The drip edge need to extend into the gutter. The surface tension of the water is causing it to hang onto the shingles and curl back underneath.
It's not perfectly clear from the picture at this site, but if you use your imagination, you can see that the "vertical" part of the drip edge will hang down into the gutter once the drip edge is slid under the shingles.
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/skill-builder/0,,193154,00.html
The other option is to increase the pitch of your roof to overcome the surface tension. I'm guessing new drip edge is cheaper.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

L-shaped flashing under the shingles extending down into the gutters.
Easy to install - if you don't mind up-and-down on the ladder.
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I didn't have that much of a space so I was able to use caulking between the gutter and the fascia board to stop water from running between the gutter and the house. MLD
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

You do have metal drip edge on there right?     http://search.hardwarestore.com/?query=drip+edge
If so, you are saying the water is following the underside of the shingle to the drip edge, running down the drip edge, then going from the lip of the drip edge onto the fascia board behind the gutter. Is that correct?
If that is the case (which I had to deal with once), you can get some aluminum or vinyl strips/flashing whatever. Cut long stips wide enough to overhang the gutter when the other end is slid up behind the drip edge lip on the facia board.
You'll need to tack it so it stays put. If you use aluminum, use aluminum nails. If you don't, the nails (even galvanized) will corrode the aluminum over time and the nailheads will eventually give.
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How about riveting it to the back edge of the gutter, if the gutter is aluminum?
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Many ways. Just providing a concept/approach.
Then there's roofing nails (2" would work), gutter spikes, railroad spikes, a crossbow, etc...and of course - duct tape (poster's pick).
Red...
"It's only temporary, unless it works."
http://www.RedGreen.com/index.cfm?app rt&a=menu
http://www.RedGreen.com/files/layout/message_rg_gal_028.jpg
http://www.pbs.org/redgreen/about.html
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The crossbow definitely sounds like a red green idea!
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Have the wife hold the drip age while you aim the cross-bow.
Have the life insurance company's number programmed into your cell phone - one touch dialing preferred.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The shingles overlap INTO the gutters? Or just hang above the gutter? If they overlap INTO the gutter, then it makes sense that water would follow the shingle if the shingle end is in water. The gutters are cleaned of leaves, right? Water will splash back under shingles when gutters are full of leaves and that can cause seepage under the roofing.
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First, try to get the company that installed them to fix the problem. Make sure the gutter is positioned so it "runs" slight lower at one end then the other for better drainage. Secondly, check to see if gutter anchors were installed every so many inches.This keeps the gutters in postion. The shingles on the roof should overlap the end of the roof slightly so the water drips into the gutters. Are the gutters installed close enough to the roof soffit?. It will rot the roof; it needs to be attended to. Are the shingles fully attached to the roof? If not, the water will find the least resistance or lowest point. (physic principle) Are the gutters raised enough to be under the shingles but slighly above thr roof ridge?
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

--
Betty Boop


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