Railway ties oozing creosote

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And once again I was bitten by the 'parochrial bug'. I got bit by that not very many days ago also.
Harry K
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And I see I did it again in my other reply.
Harry K
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Actually I am now confused too about its legality in Australia.
See http://www.baddevelopers.green.net.au/Docs/toxictimber.htm "Currently in Australia that are about 130 CCA plants, 35 boron plants and baths, 11 light organic solvent preservative (LOSP) plants, 4 creosote plants, ...."
but it also notes:
"Since the introduction of bans on the use of creosote and pentachlorophenol, chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has emerged as the most popular form of wood treatment. "
A check through the Australian legislation database at http://www.austlii.edu.au does indicate it is scheduled poison and a Class B Activity under Section 42 of the Commonwealth (Federal) Environmental Protection Act but all this means is that areas covered by Commonwealth rather than state jurisdiction:
' person shall not conduct an activity listed in Schedule 1 as a Class B activity unless the person- (a) is a party to an environmental protection agreement that is in effect in respect of that activity; or (b) holds an environmental authorisation in respect of that activity. "
There is also a lot of various Australian State legislation preventing its use in the marine environment and prescribing occupational health and safety requirements for its use. My conclusion is while its list and sales is restricted its use is not yet banned.
NB In Australia the constitution restricts the legislative powers of the Commonwealth to things like: trade and commerce with other countries, and among the States [s 51(i)]; taxation [s 51(ii)]; defence [s 51(vi)]; corporations [s 51(xx)]; immigration [s 51(xxvii)]; and external affairs [s 51(xxix)]. Of course having power over tax legislation gives it a very powerful lever over the states.
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Blue

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One of our State government Departments is recommending the use of creosote here http://agspsrv34.agric.wa.gov.au/Ento/termites.htm (the Agriculture Department of WA) so I doubt it is banned. "Creosote can be an effective timber preservative, preventing termite attack and wood rot. Protection depends upon the depth of penetration. Simply brushing creosote on wood surfaces gives little protection. Multiple applications by brush are better, but preferably soak the timber in creosote for at least 48 hours. All cutting and hole boring should be completed before soaking. Round fence posts of seasoned softwood timber, with sapwood present and the bark removed, can be successfully treated in a similar manner. "
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Blue

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Hmmm...I was hoping to find a date on that with no luck. I did find dates at the end in the list of cites for other documents with the latest one of 1993 - that would be near the time the ban was enacted but I think it was prior.
That report is also another one from Australia - looks like the WA.GOV agency just stole it in it's entirety.
Harry K
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And our Ag Department again " "The oil-borne preservative high temperature creosote, (HTC) is recommended for treating posts on the farm. A 205 L drum of HTC (ex Perth) costs about $240 if a pallet of four drums is bought. Costs can be reduced by including mineral oil or distillate, for example a 60:40 mixture of creosote and furnace oil. Some commercial creosote treaters are: Norman Bario, Mt Barker; Dryandra Timber Products, Cuballing; and C.C. and J. Russell, Narrogin. "
http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/content/LWE/VEGT/TREES/TREENOTE8.HTM
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Blue

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I'll see if I can buy some this weekend in a local hardware store.
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Blue

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That is the same as in the USA. It is not banned, but it is listed as a "restricted use" chemical, meaning that it is not available to the general public but is available to licensed persons who are trained in handling hazardous chemicals.
Red
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And you would trust the EPA with their history of fraudulent research?
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Red wrote:

Nobody said creosote was safe. If you eat it you'll get sick. If you roll around in it day in and day out for years and years without protective clothing, you'll probably get cancer, or at least some pretty nasty skin problems.
Everything isn't black and white. There are shades of gray, and this one is a pretty light shade of gray.
The amount of creosote leaching from railroad ties used as landscape timbers in your yard is tiny. The amount of contact you have with these railroad ties is tiny. Unless you have an obsessive compulsive need to roll around naked on bleeding railroad ties, or chew on them like a beaver, you will not experience any adverse effects from the simple presence of creosote.
You get more direct exposure to creosote from bonfires, your fireplace, or your wood stove, but none of those are subject to the same PANIC ALERT that these creosote-coated railroad ties are receiving.
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On May 22, 8:20am, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

For sure. the cites 'aussiblui' gave above pretty well lays it out.
If you aren't taking a bath in it or 'huffing' it - no problem.
Of course facts have never stopped the ecofreaks and the like from raising a dust storm in the middle of a flood.
Harry K
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You could screw on some cedar boards or whatever material you like the looks of. Less messy and longer lasting than the powder type solutions.
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