Radiator / furnace problem

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Every time you introduce water, you are introducing oxygen. If you close the valve, it becomes a gas and does not leave because there is nothing to replace it You are not adding water over and over, you are getting a proper purge of the air and that will not happen as long as the feed valve is closed.
Getting back to the original question: My point is that the OP has the valve closed and is never truly eliminating all the air and is probably sucking some in when the system cools. It does not mean there is a leak as you insist.. If he leaves the feed valve open for a while, it will correct. Mine did.
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That does *not* mean you can keep adding water indefinitely. It's a closed system. If there is no point at which water can leave the system, it eventually *must* become full when water is repeatedly added, and when that point is reached, no more water can be added. If water *can* be added indefinitely, it *must* be escaping somewhere.

If there is a point in the system where air can be sucked in, there is a point where water can escape.

I would define a point at which water can escape as a leak.

That's because your problem was nothing more than excess air. *His* problem, OTOH, is a leak.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Not necessarily. Check valves and refielf valves can keep water from leaving but allow air to get sucked in under a vacuum or pressure differential. That may be the OP's problem.

Your opinion, not mine. He is doing the same thing I did when the feed valve was shut off. Mine had air in it for a few weeks until I finally got around to repairing the valve so it could be left open and the air properly purged. Right now he is not purging the system properly and air is still in the system. Perhaps the OP will get back to us and let us know what he found.
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How is air going to be sucked into a system that's at 10 to 20 psi *above* ambient pressure?
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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