Radiant floor heating

Can you put radiant floro heating below Bruce harwood flooring? Will it discolor or buckel the flooring? I am having to replace some harwood in my dinning room due to water dammage. This room and my living room stay cold in the winter.
Will radiant heat flooring heat a room? DO they use much electricity?
ANy help is appreciated!
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With limitations: Bruce warrants its products, in their original manufactured condition, to be free from defects in lamination, assembly, milling, dimension and grading for as long as the original purchaser owns the floor. Bruce additionally warrants that all its engineered hardwood flooring products, even when applied on a radiant heated concrete subfloor, with subfloor surface temperature not exceeding 85F. will not buckle, cup or warp for as long as the original purchaser owns the floor when properly installed according to Bruce installation instruction procedures, and when properly maintained in accordance with such instructions and the Bruce Floor Care and Product Warranty Guide.

Yes
Y E S ! ! ! Electric heat in any form is usually the most expensive option.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

850F! I'm glad that my radiant floors stay somewhat under that temp. Could make that walk on the tile bathroom floor exiting.
The biggest problem with radiant heat is lag time. You know those days when a front moves through and it drops 30 degrees while you're at work? You can't come home, snap the furnance and have warm air pouring out the ducts in minutes. It takes time to heat the water and then the slab up to temp. Conversely, if temperatures go up sharply, the boiler will shut down but the water in the tubes is still hot.
Nice walking on those warm floors though.
Brian
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Wow, the degree symbol did not translate very well. It is 85 for anyone that may not have figured it out.
As for walking on it, 850 is not as hot as the coals the circus guys walk on. Don't be a wimp at a mere 850

Especialy for those of us that don't wear shoes around the house.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Yeah, I figured. Sure looked funny though.

I'll work on my swami impression.
Brian
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go gas it is cheaper
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Where can I buy the electric type.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Don) wrote in
In a word, yes you can install radiant heat under wood flooring. It does require more expertise than I am prepared to type out here though. There are a variety of methods depending on your conditions. It must be done correctly and carefully, and for that reason, you should to talk to a professional used to the conditions in your area.
Out of my league on this, but it's likely that radiant electric heat(using electricity to heat the carrier) will be cheaper than other forms of electric heat, but remember you read that on the internet.
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I just got my computer back. Windoze 98SE had it so badly messed up....
You can install radiant heat under any surface. Bruce Hardwoods is correct in saying that 85 is the limit for their (and any) hardwood flooring. As long as the surface temp stays below 85, you'll be all right.
On the conversation about electric vs. hydronic, you have to decide if you want to spend a large amount of money once and go with hydronic or pay the utility for the rest of the life of the electric cable.
Another thing. Once the electric mat goes bad, that's it. with hydronic, if the tubing leaks, it can be repaired.

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