Radial Arm Saw

I just bought a Sears Craftsman radial arm saw at a garage sale.
The model number is 113.199250 ... a 10-inch radial 2 1/2 horaspower saw with legs. It appears to be in great shape.
One problem though is that the power on-off switch key is missing. Do you know where I can buy one of the keys to fit the power switch? Thank you for your help. Bob Burkett snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net
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seniorgeezer wrote:

Sears sells parts for all their stuff. Just go the sears web site and order it.
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Sears.
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seniorgeezer wrote:

I expect most stores will have some around somewhere. They are almost universal.
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Joseph Meehan

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On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 10:12:31 -0700, seniorgeezer wrote:

Be very careful with that saw. RAS' are one of the most dangerous tools in a shop. Having said that, know where I can get a manual (not sure mine is the same model)? Mine is 30 years old and I've lost the manual and can't possible set it up without it. IIRC, Sears stopped publishing the manuals and recalled the units.
--
Keith


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What is your model number. I still have the manual, dado blade and shaper head I got with the saw in the early 70s. Sounds like you may be replacing or leveling the table.
For the OP, I could trace my key for you if you can't find one.
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On Sun, 11 Sep 2005 22:20:33 -0500, Andy Asberry wrote:

133-19771
Well, I lost a few of the bolts that hold the table on, so yes, I have to re-level it. A RAS takes some care to get anythign close to a decent cut from it and the alignment procedure isn't at all intuitive. Things interact. ...and the table isn't intended to be level, rather parallel to the arm (which should have a backward slope).

I *think* I still have both keys, but I'd have to look. IITC, it's just a wedge, rather like my snowblower "keys".
--
Keith


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keith wrote:

Bullshit. The only operation on my RAS that I consider dangerous is ripping. For cross cuts, it's no worse than any other saw. You are expected to take ordinary care not to pull the blade across body parts but it's not difficult. Frankly, I see many more opportunities for shop mayhem with an ordinary table saw.
I own a aforementioned RAS, table saw, band saw, compound miter saw, drill press, planer and jointer. I consider the jointer the most dangerous tool in my shop.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 09:22:49 +0000, Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

Utter nonsense! Now that we have the introductions out of the way...

"You consider?". Ok, ripping *is* part of the intended use of the tool. This *is* a dangerous operation, though I too have done it a thousand times and still can count to ten.

Actually, it is. The blade on a RAS likes to climb on top of the work piece, accelerating the carriage towards the operator. This cannot happen with a table saw, since the blace would crawl back in its hole.

You're not supposed to put body parts across a table saw blade either. The fact is that a table saw won't try to jump *at* you. A RAS certainly can!

Nonsense. If your hands are anywhere near the business end of a jointer *you* are the one not being carefull. I never use the thing without push-blocks. A jointer isn't going to jump at you either. ..and only a fool would put his hands near enough to the blades to have them sucked in by the work piece kicking. OTOH, a RAS is *designed* to be dangerous when doign some rip operations. There is a reason Sears recalled them, not that there was a chance I'd have traded mine in for a buck.
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Keith


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keith wrote:

I've only done it a few times. It scared the hell out of me. Now I do my ripping on either the band saw or table saw.

I don't recall my RAS ever trying to jump at me. Maybe that's because I maintain an adequate grip on it.

I've never had a table saw jump at me either. I have had one launch boards at high speed towards the wall behind me. Kickback on a table saw is the real deal.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 03:02:13 +0000, Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

If I had a table saw, I'd ditch the RAS. ...maybe soon. A RAS is at *best* a poor compromise between flexibility and accuracy (not to mention safety).

It's not the grip at all. The blade is rotating such that it wants to, not only come at you, but climb on top of the work. I haven't had this happen either, but it is a huge danger of the beast. Thin-kerf blades are a mixed blessing here too. While thay have less drag in the wood, they are more flexible and will have more of a tendancy to wander up on top.
I think if you look at any workshop statistics the RAS is *the* most dangerous tool in the shop, per use/installation/user. Sure, *all* shop tools are dangerous, but a bandsaw isn't about to lurch and take off an arm before you can respond.

Table saw physics is far different. For one thing the saw is cutting down against the table, rather than up, like a RAS ripping. If the blade flexes, it will take less of a bite in the wood, rather than flying toward you.

You've never seen kick-back on a RAS? I have. I've also had my RAS stopped *DEAD* when a hidden stress in a board (1" cedar) caused the kerf to instantly collapse on the blade during a *CROSS CUT*. I played hell getting the blade out of the board without ruining it. ...scared the &#|/ outta me!
I have no real problems with RAS' or any other tool, just warn people that these things aren't as benign as they apear. They are very deceptive! ....as are planers and jointers, as you've pointed out.
--
Keith


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keith wrote:

My Crapsman RAS has been slowed to a halt on several ocasions. This is something I've never had any other big tool do. I just attributed it to the saw being weak. It was my first big tool so I had nothing to compare.
If I had to do it all over again, I wouldn't buy the RAS. Since I already have it, I use it for crosscutting exclusively. It was my first big tool; I bought the table saw later and the bandsaw much later. The table saw is pretty much what I expected but the bandsaw has been a very pleasant surprise. There's a lot to be said for something that can cut wood a foot thick.
The table saw is now a lot more elaborate than Ridgid probably ever expected. I added an outfeed table, then added a router with lift to the left side of the saw (retaining the original wing). I also added an overtable guard. Once I added it, I decided I needed to add an extension wing to the right side of the saw so I'd have adequate clearance for reasonably sized panels. The whole contraption is huge now but I've a had a few folks drool when they see it.
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 03:38:58 +0000, Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

This wasn't "slowed", it was *BANG* stopped! A slowing is most likely a crappy power supply (220V would help). ...and I was sawing cedar, not oak. Amazing!

....nw that you have a table saw. ;-) If I had it to do over I would have bought the table saw (about the same $$). But we didn't. ;-)

How wide of a blade? I've wanted a bandsaw, but one that could take a wide (perhaps 3") blade, so I could re-saw too. I really haven't had much time for woodworking, so haven't invested in more stationary tools. This will change though. ;-)

Which lift? I saw one at the local Western Tools that was *awesome*. I was just about to spring for it to put in a router table, but the wife may not be happy with me plonking down $300 (and she knows were the RAS is ;-).

Lotsa floor space too! Maybe the next house. ...hopefully in a year or so.
--
Keith


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Keith, here are the setup and adjustment pages for my saw. It is not the same model number as yours but maybe close enough.
http://www.asberry.net/woodworking.htm
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I have RAS with the same model number. Try Sears parts since a number of their stationary power tools used the same key for quite a few years. This was made by Emerson Tool so you might a key for one of their tools that would work.

Be careful but a RAS is no more dangerous than a table saw if used properly.

My unit came under a safety campaign that provided a new blade guard and a replacement work table top. For details, see http://www.radialarmsawrecall.com/index2.htm .

IMO, the best book is "Fine Tuning your Radial Arm Saw" by Jon Eakes. This seems to be out of print but I heard that it is available online.
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On Wed, 14 Sep 2005 12:28:18 -0500, Andy Asberry wrote:

I printed it out and looked through it. It's not exactly the same model, but I think a little newer. Mine doesn't have the knob on the front of the arm, just a lever. The instructions look quite similar though. I'll give it a go!
Thanks!
--
Keith



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