R-22 or R-410 refrigerant?

I am replacing my NG furnace and air conditioner.
I noticed that many manufacturers of air conditioners give a choice between R-22 and R-410A.
Which one would be best suited for a new installation? Why aren't they all switching over to R-410A?
Thanks
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Walter
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Which is best? It depends, but higher efficiencies can be obtained with R-410A Which to buy? R-22 will be around for a long time yet. If all you need is a lower efficiency unit, R-22 is fine. At this point I would not be afraid to go with either R-22 or R-410A. Buy the one that best suits your requirements. Greg
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Five years ago when faced with the same decision I chose R-22 because it was tried and true and R-410A was still too new for my liking. Now if I were in the same position I would go with R-410A.
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"They all" will HAVE to (switch) in a few years. Many may be trying to get rid of the R22 units they have in stock so they are offereing them. I'm not saying there AREN'T any companies out there, but I don't know of one that doesn't manufacture BOTH R22 and R410A. Most offer either at the same price. Right now, you could go with either. One thing I would insist on: Make sure they replace the lineset. No since of having a new outdoor unit (condenser) and a new indoor coil (evaporator) and have the two attached by an old linset that may be contaminated. They are changing the inside AND the outside unit aren't they?
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R-22 has years of proven service, and plenty of guys and gals wh o can service them.
410A has major problems with absorbing moisture from the air into the refrigerant sytem.
I'd go with the old proven R-22.
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Christopher A. Young
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No offence, Chris, but please give me some facts on that statement.
How can a sealed system "absorb moisture from the air"?
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Dr. Hardcrab wrote:

Osmosis?
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Happens when the system is opened for service.
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Christopher A. Young
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O.K.
One of the complaints (which is unfounded) about R410A is that it operates under a much higher pressure than R22. When the system is off, it's not uncommon for the pressure of a 410 system to be at around 160 PSI.
Explain how air can get INTO the system when it is "opened for service".....

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wrote

If I recall, I carry a vacuum pump for that very problem! Greg
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wrote

;-]
I know. I wasn't tryin' to give stormy a hard time. I was just trying to knock down some of these "fears" about R410A.
Would I rather use R22? You betcha! But R410 is not as bad as everyone says it is and whether they like it or not, it's here to stay!!!
I don't think there was anything wrong with R22 and they should have left it alone. But politics are politics.....
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I've heard that the POE lubricant is very highly hygroscropic. And that it's almost impossible to get the moisture out of POE, even with filter dryer change.
Or, so I've heard. Perhaps others have found differently.
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Christopher A. Young
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That's what they make vacuum pumps for.....
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I don't have an online source. But I've been told that POE won't let go of the water, even with a vac pump.
OTOH, I hear some odd stuff. Worth what I paid for the advice, eh?
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It happens.....;-]
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Replacing a condensing unit. Or replacing evaporator. Copper tubing is cut, and air enters the lines. With humidity. Humidity absorbs into POE oil, and remains.
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