Quikrete Mix for setting fence posts???

Hello all,
I'm getting some conflicting advice on the best mix to use for setting fence posts for a 6ft vinyl privacy fence. I've been told that any Quikrete mix (like the #1101) will set up if poured dry. I've also been told that the fast setting the fast setting #1004 is far better. Someone even told me that the non-fast setting will only have half the strength of the red bag, fast setting mix if poured dry. I'd like to save some money if possible but don't want to sacrifice strength over the years as this fence will catch lots of wind over the years.
Any advice?
Thanks,
Doug
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One advantage to pouring dry is, elminating the mixing process while setting posts, and less clean-up :), but..............
I've always had water near-by, either with a hose or bucket, because it just didn't seem right to work with 'crete without it. I also thought it depends on the dryness of the ground.
what I've always done was placed 'bout an inch or so of water in the hole.....then dumped the 'crete to about quarter/way, an worked it with a diggin iron or wrecking bar..then plumb the post, add a little more H2O...'crete...work it..plumb.... H2O...'crete...work it..plumb.... H2O...'crete...work it..plumb.... till you reach the top.
When you near the top, make sure you have the 'crete pasty, 'cause ya need to end up with a slight rise/mound to allow the rain/water to run away from the post....even if they are vinyl...besides it looks better.
IMHO......Sky
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(like the #1101) will set up if poured dry. I've also been told that the fast setting the fast setting #1004 is far better. Someone even told me that the non-fast setting will only have half the strength of the red bag, fast

Sounds about right, I've always heard the 'quicker' the 'crete sets the harder it becomes.
I'm glad I used the water. One job I had done was a pressure treated pool deck. 17 years.......Still Sq., Still Plumb. Sky
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One last Item......Make sure your footers are deep enough. In Fla. can be ground level, In Canada up to or over 48/52" Sky
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sky wrote:

I'll second that. Don't get lazy with the hole digger. I did, went 24" deep in Alabama and now I have a few posts that are out of plumb. Believe me it's not the freeze/thaw cycle but the drought cycle in this alabama red clay that gets the earth moving around.
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Wind?
Sorta funny.
I put in a vinyl fence. The instructions said put concrete around the posts, put 2 pieces or rebar inside the posts, then fill the posts with concrete. These are 4 or 5 inch square posts.
Those posts aren't going anywhere.
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http://www.quikrete.com/diy/SettingPosts.html
Dump a bucket of water in the hole and then pour in the quikrete or vice versa, don't make it complicated. It's vinyl fencing, the vinyl will break a million years before the concrete no matter how badly you botch the job.
--
Mac Cool

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The fast setting is much better. And I say mix it wet first and then place it in the hole.
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wrote:

The fast stuff just has a shot of calcium carbonate in it to heat up the reaction. There is nothing there to make it any stronger. Some even argue that if you don't cure it right (keep it wet) it ends up weaker.
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Hi gang!, just got back from work.........
Well Doug, there ya go, six more opinons an your probably still not sure how to go.
Ya gotta have good footers, anyone ever notice how the hole dug differently when ya got close to it? (the footer), like a different texture.
Dans instructions sound real good, esp.the rebar, but Dan, is that dry on the outside, and wet inside?
Have done Mac's and tmurf's way, and.
gfretw's right too.
'crete's a forgiving animal, if ya wanna pour in freezin weather, ya can get a retarder to slow the curing down. Wanna color it?, I think you can also add scents to it
If it be me, I'd follow dan's lead an read/use the instructions from the fence mfg., and go with the 1101
'cause in a way it's like Mac says 'this isn't rocket science'
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Wet all the way around.
I suppose dry would have worked for filling the hole.
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Mac Cool wrote:

I agree 100% with this. When I put in a 700' fence last summer, fast-set priced out twice as expensive as regular quickrete, and I have more time than money. 24 hours isn't too long for me to wait for fence posts to set.
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Quickcrete (brand name) is expensive. Use the no name stuff sold by Lowes or HD..about half the price For fencepost "anchors" it doesnt matter..Why do you need fast setting ? Just brace the posts and let it set overnight.
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Rudy wrote:

But you should think about providing bearing surface rather than just a blob on the bottom of the post. Spread it out horizontally a few inches down in the dirt. Or use long horizontal rebar to stablize it.
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For a fence post, the extra expense of quick setting or high strength is unwarranted. The post hole concrete is a mix with more/bigger/random sized aggregate in it and optimized to make it easier to absorb water from the ground.
The whole concept of putting the mix in dry is a time saver. Not only do you not have to premix the concrete but the dry mix holds the post steady while the ground water permeates the mix and allows the chemical reaction to occur. With mixed concrete you will need to brace the post in place while it sets.
The ground does need to be moist or you can just dump water on top of the mix in the hole. Sure it takes longer, sure it is not as hard, but you do not need this for a post of a lightweight vinyl fence
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Doesn't make any difference regarding the concrete chosen. Cheap fence post will die before the concrete caves in. Just pour it with your choice, dry or wet pour. If you decide to move to something more substantial, please post again with that information.
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Jonny
"Doug Steckel" < snipped-for-privacy@ptd.net> wrote in message
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Am I missing somethin' here or what?....................
All theses posts, and Doug Steckel hasn't replied..
He's either gone to another group.............or he's out there doin' the job....hope so......
atta' boy doug........Sky
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