Quiet garage door opener recomendation?

I live in a condo. A neighbors garage is directly below my bedroom. They recently installed a craftsman screw drive model and it is very loud. I'm working with my neighbor to fix the problem. We're first going to try a "vibration isolator kit" that a Lift Master dealer told us about. If this does not work, I plan on purchasing a different model opener.
A lot of information I've found on the net so far says that belt drive models with DC motors are the quietest, but dealers we've contacted (Lift Master dealers) all discourage belt drive models on wooden "tilt up" doors (it's a one-car garage btw). They say the units will wear out, the belts will stretch, etc. (Maybe other brands would be up to the challenge?)
I've been reading about the Genie Excelerator model. It is a screw drive with a DC motor. The DC motor is promising, but it's still a screw drive. How quiet is this model?
Any help or advice on resolving this situation is appreciated.
Thanks, Robert
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Where is the noise coming from, and what's it's nature? Humming/banging/first chorus of a Cheeky Girls song/...
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http://inquisitor.i.am/ | mailto: snipped-for-privacy@i.am | Ian Stirling.
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What type of isolation system did you create, I have a 1/2 hp Stanely its loud, my mother had a beltdrive installed and you can't hear it at all. Tom

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Remember that it did not make it any quieter in the garage, but it sure helped in the bedroom over the garage.
I modified the mounting of the powerheads (I have two doors) so they are suspended via two pieces of rubber cut from a floormat. At the end of the track over the door I added a rubber cushion between the bracket and the header it was screwed into. Total cost about $15.00 US for both doors since I had to buy the floormat.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (robert parker) wrote:

A few people have posted that the Wayne Dalton i-Drive is supposed to be very quiet. The motor mounts on the bar above the door and does direct drive, so no chain or belt is required. A side benefit is the extra headroom in the garage as there is no bar.
I'd like to hear about anyone's person experience with the unit. They are available at Lowes, among other places.
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Not sure about that - the description at Lowes implies that standard doors will work as it says you must use the electric eye with a standard door, but do not need it with the Dalton "no pinch" style door.
I would believe that standard hardware won't work, but that should not be that expensive to retrofit. Would like to know though...
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (robert parker) wrote in message

Robert,
First let me say that the isolator brackets will not do a whole lot for keeping the noise from going up thru the floor. We have used them on many condo's (where architects require them) with living space right above the garage & in most cases they have very little effect on noise reduction. Especially if the garage ceiling & unit floor is all the same slab of concrete without any dead air space in-between.
The Liftmaster 2500 DC Belt Drive opener is in my opinion the quietest opener on the market without a question. However it is not made for big heavy doors. The next in line of least noise would be the Liftmaster 2580 1/2 HP Belt Drive since the motor is suspended on a noise isolator bracket inside the cover & the cover is insulated.
If the one-piece single wood door works smoothly & easily by hand I don't see where a belt drive would tear up any more than any other opener. We literally sell hundreds of belt-drive openers a month (although the one-piece doors here are steel & the wood are sectional) and install them on heavy sectional steel doors that have heavy steel bracing attached for hurricane wind loads without any problems. (The better models have lifetime (as long as you own) guarantees on the motor & belt & 5 year guarantee on parts).
You did not say if the Craftsman opener has a one-piece rail or if it is split into 3-pieces. The DYI opener rails are chopped so they will fit in trunks of cars & since they bow where they are spliced together they tend to be more noisier than the one-piece rails sold by dealers. Could this be the problem because usually screw drive openers are not normally "loud" when they are new? However any screw drive opener will tend to get noiser over a period of time as parts wear. While some brands need to be greased on a regular basis they usually will never be as quiet again as when they were new.
Doordoc www.DoorsAndOpeners.com
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snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (v) wrote in message

Thanks everyone for your comments so far.
I'm certain the noise I'm hearing is primarily from the garage door opener itself, and not from the springs, hinges, etc of the door (this is a one piece, tilt-up door. Not a sectional roll-up door). The noise I'm hearing is steady, like the motor running... vibrating my floor (right under my bed!) There's a moderately loud bang as it comes to a stop, but I don't think thats the part that wakes me up every morning. I'm pretty certain it's the electric motor. I haven't yet seen the unit (its not my garage) or checked to make sure everything is well lubricated (the opener is new, the door hardware may need some oil.) I don't expect I'll see the unit until my neighbor receives the "vibration isolator kit" I mentioned in my original post. I offered to install the kit. I'll inspect everything then.
There was a automatic opener before this new one. I don't remember it ever giving me a problem. I think it was a genie screw drive model, installed by the condo developer. It could be that my previous neighbor simply didn't use it early in the morning like my new neighbor does. Either that, or the new craftsman is a real monster noise-wise compared to the old genie.
I also wonder if this new opener is installed differently than the old one? Perhaps this new one is fastened with lag screws into a beam in the ceiling / floor? And the old one was merely fastened to the ceiling dry-wall with molly bolts? I don't know... all speculation on my part.
A previous poster didn't seem to think the isolator kit would provide much help. And another poster mentioned rigging up their own device for isolating the noise. I might have to try something like that. But I can't imagine hanging the opener from a non ridged device as previously described. I envision getting a 2X4 the width of the garage... attaching its ends to the walls rather than to the ceiling. Between the ceiling and the 2X4 would be felt or cork pad. I'd then bolt the opener to the 2X4 rather than directly to the ceiling. What do you think?
Well, thanks again everyone for your ideas and comments.
Robert
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On 17 Aug 2003 19:16:06 -0700, someone wrote:

If the 2x4 isn't structurally attached to the ceiling, don't connect the two with anything. An air gap would be better than cork or felt. I don't recall how wide the garage was, a mere 2x4 can be kinda floppy in an unsupported long length. Also, what is the height of the garage ceiling in relation to the top of the door, is there room for any appreciable structure between the opener and the ceiling????
You gotta see it to evaluate it. If everybody is cooperating so far, can't you ask to see it now so you could plan with more info?
good luck, -v.
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My brother and I fixed some wires on one and after that it was terribly noisy. I bought all the lube, etc., which did nothing. Then, when I took the plastic cover back off to examine the motor, the noise stopped. The plastic cover was hitting the bolt in the back and making a terrible racket. Now it is as quiet as can be. Try moving the plastic cover around a bit and see if you can prevent it from making contact with the bolt in the back, which turns the long screw.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Robert) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com (tb) wrote:

Condos are frequently bought by first time buyers, who aren't tuned in to the potential problems with certain floorplans. Same kind of people tend to buy house on corner lots.
Local builder started selling 3-plexes with one of the three units crossing over the garages for the two lower units. Saw the ad in the paper and had to laugh.
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