Quick temporary repair for hole in wall

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To repair the plumbing for the kitchen sink, it was necessary to break the wall under the kitchen sink to get at the plumbing. The hole is about 7 or 8 inches in diameter.
Until I can have the hole repaired permanently, what can I use to cover that hole temporarily? I'm worried about insects or even mice coming through there tonight.
--
Steven L.

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Steven L. wrote:

Roll of duct tape?
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Tony, you are a genius !!!!
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I thought mousies would chew through duct tape? And, it leaves sticky residue on the wall.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Tony, you are a genius !!!!
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On 11/26/2012 10:58 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

That's what I thought of too.
Is there any problem with the duct tape being near the hot water pipes?
--
Steven L.

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I have seen this one where they use cable ties to attach to the wall. Just drill some holes in both pieces and feed through. this allows for removal without any mudding ot real damage. <a href http://www.buycableties.com/ BuyCableTies</a> has always been a good reference for me.
--
BuyCableTies


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Metal single use cooking pan from Dollar Tree? Trim to shape with bandage shears. (sized much larger than the hole). Secure to the wall with drywall screws, and washers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
To repair the plumbing for the kitchen sink, it was necessary to break the wall under the kitchen sink to get at the plumbing. The hole is about 7 or 8 inches in diameter.
Until I can have the hole repaired permanently, what can I use to cover that hole temporarily? I'm worried about insects or even mice coming through there tonight.
--
Steven L.



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I used a sheet of thick clear plastic that came with something and used shipping tape to adhere everwhere. Left about two weeks before could continue. Even survived some strong winds. [this was a hole through the outside wall as I moved the Stove Top Vent up 8 inches.]
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 10:41:44 -0500, "Steven L."

I have seen sheet rock guys do this many times under the sink. They cut a stud (or two) just a couple of inches longer than the opening to use it for the stud inside the wall. They then screw a piece of sheet rock larger than the opening for the cover.
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I'm not a rock guy but I've done that kind of repair many times. Pretty easy.
The duct tape answer is classic.
Virtually every question on this group can be answered "duct tape" or "WD-40".
If it was my hole under the sink:
Make edges of hole square.
Cut piece of plasterboard to fit.
Cut 2 wood strips longer than the hole.
Slip sticks in hole and attach with screws on top and bottom.
Screw plasterboard patch to 2 strips of wood.
Spackle.
--
Dan Espen

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I like that but I'm not sure about 2 issues.
On a highly visible wall, I think the thickness of the paper might be visible. Not an issue for under the sink.
The only support for the patch is paper and joint compound. Pressing on that part of the wall might lead to visible cracks. Again, not an issue under the sink.
--
Dan Espen

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I prefer the stick inside the wall method so I don't have to worry about the paper showing or bubbling or anything.
With the sticks and a patch all I have to mud is the gap around the patch.
However, I do see one advantage of the "California patch": You can use any thickness of drywall you have handy...it doesn't have to be the same as the existing wall.
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Back before drywall screws were common and sheetrock was still nailed to the studs, one variation on the "wooden strip" method was as follows:
Put some wood glue on the face of the wooden strip and wrap a piece of string around it before slipping it into the wall. Keeping tension on the string to hold the wood in place, run the string through a hole in the center of the drywall patch. Wrap the string around a pencil and spin the pencil until it (and the patch) are flush with the wall.
Mud as much of the seams as possible and when it dries, cut the string to remove the pencil. Stuff the string into the hole and finish applying mud to the seams and the hole.
With the glue and the mud holding everything in place, the patch will be secure.
These days drywall screws take the place of the glue.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/quick-temporary-repair-for-hole-in-wall-723530-.htm IronmanAndrew wrote:
I have seen it repiared with Cable ties before. Just buycableties, then drill holes is both places that they attach to. slip both ends through and tighten. This is usually when there is no other options.
--





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Steven L. wrote:

Scrap piece of plywood?
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If you have mice/insects in your wall a hole in that wall is not your problem.
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Yep. Since it looks like the OP is going to have somebody else do the patch, he should leave it alone, or stuff some rags in it if it makes him feel better. That'll stop bugs. Mice will chew right through drywall anyway if you have an infestation. That a totally different problem.
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On 11/26/2012 10:41 AM, Steven L. wrote:

Thanks, those were all good suggestions.
I covered the hole with duct tape, but the edge of the duct tape is abutting the hot water pipe. Could that cause a problem?
--
Steven L.

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If it does, put some WD-40 on it.
No, really, your duct tape will not burst into flames.
--
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On Mon, 26 Nov 2012 17:20:28 -0500, "Steven L."

I don't think so neither. I think I've seen video using duct tape as a temporary solution on a split radiator hose (tho I never tried it).
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