Quick recommendation: What tool for one-time cutting of inch-thick sandstone paving stones?

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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 19:44:16 -0600, jw wrote:

I didn't realize the blades were that cheap. Even a 'standard' steel blade costs much more than that! I figured a diamond blade would be expensive. I wonder 'what' a masonry blade is (gotta google that).
I will snap a picture in the light of the morning and post so you can see what they look like.
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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Here's a pack of five angle-grinder blades for $5.99.
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Chuck Banshee wrote:

It is a fiber circle, about 1/8" thick, with grit embedded in it. The grit is probably corundum (aluminum oxide). They cut by grinding, wear pretty fast and are way less than $5.00.
--

dadiOH
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 07:14:21 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

A 'circle' would be just perfect for the sprinkler head in this picture to pop up inside the stone:

But for most of these, I would need something straight:

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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Uhhh...circular like a saw blade. They are used to cut straight. One does that by putting it on a circular saw and cutting with the edge. Like a saw blade :)
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dadiOH
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For many people, there's a good reason they call them "circular saws". ;-)
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On 1/17/2012 10:40 AM, Chuck Banshee wrote:

flagstone.
you could cut the sprinkler hole with a diamond hole bit and some water, but that would set you back $100 or more. easier is simply a masonary drill bit. it'd be slow, but still work ok, although there's some slight chance that the slab will crack.
if you take it to a place that fabricates granite countertops, they'd probably drill your hole for a few dollars.
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 13:09:19 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

I'll look for a one or two-inch masonry drill bit for the sprinkler.

Actually, for this one-time-only cut, that might work best if I can't find a large enough masonry drill bit to cut the sprinkler hole.
Thanks!
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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Another solution is to put the sprinkler on a stone joint line and make two semi-circular holes. That should be pretty easy, no special equipment.
--

dadiOH
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Get a blade used to cut holes for doorknobs and locksets It goes on your drill and makes perfect holes
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..or better than "make sure the outlet is grounded" is "make sure the outlet is a GFCI".
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Well, yeah. But I didn't want to get ridiculous.
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-snip-

google 'GFCI Triple Tap cord' - I think I paid $25 for mine & it gives me peace of mind-- and I only have to walk to the end of the cord if it trips.
Jim
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No need for *me* to Google GFCI Triple Tap cord.
Long, long before GFCI-protected extension cords were readily available at any Home Center, I took about 3 feet of outdoor extension cord, put a plug on one end and a GFCI duplex receptacle in a weather proof receptacle box on the other. It lives in the same crate that my extension cords live.
I've had that same peace of mind for decades.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 19:54:40 +0000, Chuck Banshee wrote:

If I score them, what tool is used for the scoring?
Here's a picture of the stone that needs a round hole:

And, here's a picture of a set that needs straight cuts:

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Chuck Banshee wrote:

Well, masons used to cut bricks by scoring them with a mason's chisel... (Amazon.com product link shortened)26828475&sr=1-17
then break them. I don't think that would work well in your case because of the layered structure of the stone. Your best bet is a diamond blade. You can get a 4 1/2" angle grinder at HF for $15; a dry cut diamond blade to fit for less than $10.00 (Amazon.com product link shortened)
To drill the round hole, you can get bits for that purpose...you can do it by hand with a star drill...you can do it with a saber saw with a tile cutting carbide blade (has carbide pieces sintered on)...you can do it by hand with a carbide rod blade on a hack saw. With th saws, you gotta have a hole first.
--

dadiOH
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 14:41:15 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

Here's the angle grinder I have ... with the cutting wheels I had in stock...

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Rent a masonry saw.
Jimmie
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While I'm at it (cutting flagstone to create a walkway) ... would you suggest I try to repair these three holes in existing flagstone set in concrete?
How would you fix these damaged pieces (all set in concrete)?
This is in the worst damaged flagsone (in a heavy load area):

This is inexplicably just starting to break into pieces:

And, this one, looks like it's going to go the same route:

I'm guessing the way to fix these are to chisel them out, and to chisel out the concrete below them - and then fit a custom-fit piece of the right thickness back into place.
The problem of course is fitting the piece in and cutting all the concrete out.
Is there an easier way to repair these flaws?
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On Wed, 18 Jan 2012 04:08:22 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

Seems you could find an epoxy filler for that. Color matching would be the tricky part.
--Vic
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