Questions on siding over asbestos shingles

The house we're buying is one of the last ones in the neighborhood that hasn't had the siding updated, so I'd like some tips on siding over the asbestos shingles. Here's what I was thinking - please tell me where I'm wrong (there will be plenty of opportunity, I'm sure).
My first thought was to go directly over the asbestos siding with vertical sheets of board-and-batten type T1-11. Would I need a moisture barrier underneath the T1-11?
My other thought was to cover the asbestos siding with 1/4 inch plywood, then go back with a lap siding. Moisture barrier?
What else should I look at that is INEXPENSIVE other than vinyl?
Also, how will the added thickness of the siding affect the windows and doors? Do they need to be removed back to the rough opening and then reinstalled after the siding is on?
Dumb questions, I know. I haven't done any siding before, but I really want to do this myself. Sweat equity is a wonderful thing if the job is done right.
Thanks, Brent
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Please be aware that the asbestos shingles are like glass. The break readily when hammering things into them. When we had our siding done, I had the contractor remove the shingles and properly dispose of them. A neighbor did not and could hear the shingles breaking and sliding down as the siding was installed. This obviously affected how evenly the wall was insulated even with Celotex in place. It may have had an impact due to gaps between the siding and the wall.
Good Luck.

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On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 12:17:24 -0400, Baron wrote:

I would second this. The shingles should be removed. Having just done this myself, I was surprised that, at least around here, the asbestos disposal wasn't that big a deal. They had to be double bagged in special garbage bags, and sent to an approved dump at @ twice the cost of regular garbage. If doing this yourself, check with your local regulations and wear an approved respirator. The finished job will be superior and actually easier to complete.
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snip

snip
Thanks for the advice. I've been trying to find out from the city what the regs are to remove the tile. This is a small town and nobody seems to know. The state hasn't returned my email yet.
I've also been doing a lot of reading and asking around, and opinion seems to be split as to whether to remove or leave on. I was really REALLY hoping to avoid the hassle and expense of removing it. Surely there's a way to get through the tiles without shattering them.
I guess if I have to take it off, I have to take it off....but if there are any alternatives I'd sure like to hear about them.
Thanks again, Brent
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had
neighbor
siding
Okay, so here's my next invention idea.
Someone should invent or produce a Tyvek-type sheeting with a sticky/glue side for use in this type of job. The Tyvek sheets could then be adhered to the asbestos siding before doing the aluminum or vinyl siding installation. The sheeting would provide an added layer of insulation and a moisture barrier, and would keep the asbestos shingles from dropping down when cracked during the installation of the aluminum or vinyl siding. Homeowners get to keep the insulation value of the original asbestos siding, don't have to worry about the time and expense of removing the old asbestos shingles, don't have to worry about the cost of disposing the old asbestos shingles, and create less of an asbestos hazard because the asbestos is being encapsulated in place instead of being broken up and removed and transported elsewhere.
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"and would keep the asbestos shingles from dropping down when cracked during the installation of the aluminum or vinyl siding"
Actually, I drilled the shingles for nails so they would not crack. Hard on bits and time consuming.
Walt Conner
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Dude -- I hope you enjoyed asking those questions, cuz I'll bet that you're gonna really hate the answers.
Asbestos shingles are almost as brittle as glass. It is impossible to drive a nail or screw through them without shattering the shingle -- unless you drill a hole first. But of course, drilling the stuff causes LOTS of harmful dust, so don't do it. And if you just go ahead and hammer away, you'll have lots of asbestos in the air, and a lot to dispose of. Got a permit for that?
My advice would be to have a conversation with the local building inspector's office. Tell talk to them about what can and can't be done. Ask what has been done there in the past on other houses. Maybe from that, you'll have an idea.
Until a few years ago, I owned a house with asbestos shingles. Biggest pain I ever dealt with, even if they weren't carcinogenic. You can't repair or replace them, can't widen a window or door, can't properly add a deck. All in all, I think you're gonna hate them.
Best wishes,
Vast Projects Should not be Founded on Half Vast Ideas.
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Brent Barkow) wrote in message

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On 21 Oct 2003 13:23:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (YesMaam27577) wrote:

Why do you think that you can't repair or replace them?
GAF Building Products still makes asbestos siding replacement shingles. Thye have exactly the same size and style as the originals. The only exception is that the asbestos has been taken out.
In my area Barco Supply - a roofing/siding distributer with many branches around the country distributes the GAF replacement shingles.
As other posters have said, a good paint job will last MANY years on asbestos siding.
Doug
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How about using a nail gun at a low PSI so the nail stick out a little. This would allow the siding to move, as it should? Nail guns will not crack the siding....
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Brent Barkow) wrote in message

Yes, you do want to remove it first. I too removed my own siding last summer and the stuff breaks very easily. For me the dump fees were the same as for regular garbage. My 3500 sq. ft. house had 5300 pounds of asbestos siding on it. I did have to double bag it in 6 mil plastic and tape in cardboard box. If you have someone remove it make sure you get copies of the receipts from the waste disposal station so you know it is dumped correctly.
I would advise against T1-11. Not only does it look bad but it rots quickly. I would also stay away from vinyl siding. It makes the house look like plastic. Also, if you have a problem 5 years from now with a leak or something it can be a big problem if you need to get under that stuff. For me there was the original redwood siding underneath the asbestos. If I were you I would check out Hardi siding. It is a composite cement siding that looks like wood. It comes in several different profiles and comes with something like a 75 year warranty. I built a shed out of it a few years ago and it was cheaper than T1-11.
Greg
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> I would advise against T1-11. Not only does it look bad but it rots

My house was built in 1972 with the T111 sheets and I haven't had a problem with it. Like other siding out there, you DO have to care for it, caulking and painting as necessary.
I built my shed out of T111 because I liked the look of it.
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I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I don't happen to like it. I do know there was a class action suit against a manufacturer of T1-11 and they lost. I don't know the details of it and I never looked in to it. I do know that my house built in 1895 and had little or no maintance on it (a rental for 89 years) and the siding is in great shape. It was under asbestos siding for 4 or 5 decades. Your guess is as good as mine as to whether that helped or hurt.
Class Action Suit http://www.masoniteclaims.com/masonite/index.html
Greg
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May I ask why you want to remove the asbestos siding? Is it falling apart? Keeping it and painting over it if needs new paint has a great advantage in that you have a siding that will easily outlast anything else you'd put up in its place. I have asbestos and I just finished painting it & it looks really nice. I went from a darker, gray color to cream color and it took a huge amount of paint but it was worth doing. I don't expect to have to paint it again for another 10 -15 years.
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one method that works to cover asbestos siding.
Install strapping or 3" strips of 3/4 plywood vertically with tapcon screws. install over existing studs (screw where the bottoms of the asbestos siding lap). then install new siding.
(T1-11 would not be my 1st choice) the cap flashing in between sheets is very tacky to look at on a house.
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I'm going to check out all of this advice further. I wanted to get started in the spring, so I have some time.
As far as the T1-11, what I was actually looking at was the HardiPanel. I guess I was mistaken and thought that it was T1-11, when actually it was something else.
Thanks again everybody, Brent
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I have installed aluminum siding directly over asbestos siding, no strips, no problem. Aluminum siding and vinyl siding are nailed loose enough for them to slide with expansion/contraction and are interlocked, looks and works fine.
Walt Conner
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A good paint job could past you 25 years and you will not have to deal with any of the headaches or expense you're now looking at. Who cares if your house doesn't look exactly like the neighbors...

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