Question on home wiring

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On Sat, 20 Dec 2008 16:25:58 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Grounds have to be green, green with a yellow stripe or bare Neutrals have to be gray or white. No other colors are specified and a "hot" can use anything else. In a commercial installation you might see 10 or more colors for the hots.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

>>>>

>>>

And it is inconceivable a licensed electrician, residential or other, wouldn't know that.
--
bud--


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On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 08:31:25 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

By code all the wires will need to be "tagged" - all neutrals white, all lines black (or possibly red) - at BOTH ends.
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For code questions, only your local code enforcement office can give you the last word on this. Often they make changes/additions to the NEC and that is what you'll have to work to. The NEC is MINIMUMs: Local offices often add to them. Give them a call; they're usually more than happy to discuss it with people. You can also make certain of the permit situation at the same time; you may need to pull a permit but in your case it'll be a very simple process as will the inspection.
Twayne
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On Dec 18, 11:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

buffalo ny: the code is constantly revising for home safety. reconsider and hire an electrician, and first think of maximum heat/ air conditioning electric that you may want there in the future. if the homeowner is permitted to run low voltage in your area, the 12 volt stuff, it is less lethal for the next guy if you make a mistake in the wiring. for the electrician lay out the outlets and appliances on a sketch. number your outlet covers to match the breaker numbers in the panel at the end of the job. and add all audio, remote doorbells, tv, phone, video, cable, internet, intercom extra future wiring, as well as sink, shower, water, sewer, and gas, in today's job.
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I could be wrong, but I think you may also need to derate the wire sizes because of multiple circuits in the cable, i.e. treating the 12 ga cables like 15 amp, regarding loads and the breaker.
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wrote:

yeah some derating will be necessary,
besides which copper price is down, run a new heavy whatever cable like a 6 gauge to a sub panel and save yourself a lot of hassle, and lots of questions at home resale where nervous home inspectors will jump all over your cabling.
I ran some 10 gauge once for outdoor lights left over from my sheds power line run, and regretted it . how miserable to work with for lowly lighting
needed 10 gauge with 20 amp breaker for shed cause of long run, and possible use of heavy load table saw out there in future.
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That is what I have previously done, 6-gauge to a subpanel. Initially, I only brought out two 120V circuits for outlets, and a 220V circuit for lighting. But, it's getting *really* cold, and a friend will be working in there with me. With multiple lathes, halogen work lights, and space heaters working at the same time, it was time for more outlets.
Now, with 6 20-amp circuits for 120V outlets, I'm more than set. If I needed more than that, I'd need a bigger run to the subpanel - and since I only have a 100A service on the house, pulling more than 50 amps just to the garage wouldn't be that good of an idea.
Doing one splice in each box with the 10-gauge wasn't bad at all. Everything went quite well, with no surprises.
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It is necessary to derate whenever you have more than 3 current carrying conductors in a bundle or conduit. However, the ampacity of small conductors with 90 degree insulation is higher than the conventional maximum OCPD. For example, for most branch circuits, #14 can not be fused at higher than 15 amps, but for purposes of derating the ampacity of #14 with 90 degree insulation is 20 amps. So as long as your derating factor is at least 0.75, you still get an ampacity of at least 15 amps. The upshot is that for #10 and smaller, with 6 conductors, there is no need to decrease the OCPD from the usual.
Yours, Wayne
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