Question on CPVC cement...


Can I use CPVC cement on standard PVC? Or do I have to have a can of the regular stuff, to put my project together? Just wondering, and really don't want t screw this up over something so simple...
Thanks,
Dave
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Get the right stuff, or just buy the multipurpose (red can). That works on all of them (PVC, CPVC, ABS).
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Aah. Thank you. Much appreciated.
Dave
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Use PVC cement. CPVC comes in two types. A one step and two step type where you need a CPVC cleaner.
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Huh. I didn't kow CPVC came in two types. I must have the one step type. Thanks for the info.
Dave
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Hi Dave,

I'm not trying to be sarcastic, but what does the can say? When in doubt, read the directions... :)
In any case, a small can of dedicated CPVC cement is cheap, and not worth risking possible complications. If your can of PVC cement is old, it's probably gelled by now anyway.
Regardless of which cement you use, remember to clean the pipe and fitting first with the purple "primer".
Good luck,
Anthony
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Why purple primer?
R
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Obviously, the color doesn't matter, but around here (WA state) the purple primer is what you typically find in the home centers. I haven't seen clear primer in years.
PVC/CPVC primer is usually purple. CPVC cement is usually orange. PVC cement is usually clear (or blue). ABS cement is usually black.
The color primarily lets you (and the inspector) see at a glance what type of glue was used and whether or not the primer was used.
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote: ...

Mostly it serves to let the applicator quickly know they covered the joint entirely.
--
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On Fri, 6 Nov 2009 15:40:29 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

or clear primer. They just dye it purple for the inspector ... same stuff. Do use the primer tho. There is not 2 kinds of pipe or 2 kinds of cement, only 2 kinds of plumbers. Ones who do a good job and those who skip a step and have to do it over after they clean up after the flood.
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Ok.. question... at what point does PVC cement go bad and not perform well in "welding" a PVC joint. Obviousy if it is so hardened that it won't coat the PVC, then it is bad. But what if it is just a bit gelled (as in a little thick) but still is able to give a nice liquid coating to the PVC? Will it still be just as strong?
I only occasionally end up using PVC so the cement and primer can end up sitting around my basement for years. I do a good job of sealing the cans tightly and then put them in air-tight plastic bags, so the stuff does seem to stay fresh longer than one might expect -- on principal, I hate to throw things out, but obviously, I would if needed for an optimum weld.
Any thoughts?
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I have used slightly gelled PVC cements in non-critical situations (outdoor lines, or other easily accessable locations) and they seem to work fine as long as you can get a good coating around the pipe and fitting.
However, if I'm joining a pipe that will be embedded in a wall or otherwise covered up, I wouldn't take the risk for the small cost of a new can of cement.

Once you open the can, you let air in that will let the cement start gelling. For that reason, I usually buy two or three of the smallest cans instead of the large cans. I use what I need for the current project, then keep the unopened cans for those spur of the moment plumbing tasks.
Also, if you discover the cement has gelled a few years later, it's less wasteful to lose part of a small can than part of a larger can.
Anthony
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Unless I have one big project going on I buy the smallest can available because they go bad pretty quick once you open them. I usually keep a few new small cans around, just so I have a fresh one if I am fixing something I want to stay fixed. Three bucks is nothing compared to a flood.
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