Question on 220V A/c outlet

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On 4/1/2011 9:14 PM, Robert Green wrote:

The Romex my dad taught me about had plastic insulated conductors covered with some kind of jacket that was silver and looked sort of like fish scales. It was some sort of fiber reinforced paper, possibly tar paper with a silver finish. We wired the family home with it back in the 1950's and 1960's. Darn, I'm getting old. :-)
TDD
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On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 00:35:39 -0500, The Daring Dufas

with Romex, particularly on a hot summer day, he was BLACK. Was he ever happy when they came out with the plastic sheathed stuff!!! That old stuff was NASTY.
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On 4/2/2011 3:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I like MC cable since I got a turntable dispenser for rolls of wire coiled like MC is. It comes off straight with no kinks or loops and does make it so much easier to install the cable for long runs.
TDD
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I have one run of it in the basement where the previous owner's son built a room - probably in the '60s and I always wondered WTF is this stuff? Never seen it before nor since. It really is odd looking stuff compared to what came before and what came after.
In this case, it was two conductor without ground and a neutral drawn from a different circuit because he was tapping off an existing lighting circuit to create a wall outlet. <sigh> He also paneled the room using furring strips, no insulation or prep and banging holes into weak cinderblock with nails that did a lot of damage. I guess you have to learn somewhere. When I built a darkroom in my parent's basement my plumbing and electrical work didn't look very professional, either.
The rest is old 1940 cloth wiring and my newer blue NM 12 w/G. Bought two 250' reels in 1985 from Hechinger's for $28 - still half plenty of it left. I wonder what it costs now? Rewiring an old, small Cape Cod doesn't take a lot of wire, just a lot of patience. Now at least every circuit that draws more that 10A is on the newer wire. The cloth is still holding up, but it doesn't tolerate a lot of fussing with. But it runs to the attic and then drops down to the various rooms. It was easier to leave that in place and to simply add new runs from the basement to the kitchen and other places where I didn't want to take a chance pulling 15A for space heaters, central vacuum., radial arm saw, etc. on the old cloth wire.
-- Bobby G.
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Then why do they put a seperate green ground conductor in the aluminum MC cable where conventional BX did not have a seperate ground? These days if you go to Lowes or HD, all they have is MC Lite 12/2 with a ground. I think HD still has the "classic" 12/2 steel BX on the shelf with no seperate ground.
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Then why do they put a seperate green ground conductor in the aluminum MC cable where conventional BX did not have a seperate ground? These days if you go to Lowes or HD, all they have is MC Lite 12/2 with a ground. I think HD still has the "classic" 12/2 steel BX on the shelf with no seperate ground.
They are simply two different types of cables, which are used for different purposes. For example: In places of public assembly, you can use MC cable , but AC cable is not allowed. Aluminum sheathed AC cable has been on the market since 1959, the same year that the Nec required AC cable to have the bond conductor
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** As Bud and DPB said, since you're replacing it, you may as well use the 20 amp receptacle
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On 4/1/2011 1:08 PM, bud-- wrote:

AFAIK, 15 and 20A outlets are both UL tested for 20A; the only difference is the prong arrangement to not allow a 20A cordset to plug into a 15A outlet but the 15A plug is still ok w/ a 20A breaker.
I know this is so for 120V and while I didn't go look at the current UL protocol I'm virtually positive the same is true for 250V rated outlets.

True dat if replacing anyway or new work...but I don't believe there's any overriding reason to replace the existing "just because" or for Code reasons.
--
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On 4/1/2011 3:33 PM, dpb wrote: ...

UL 498 contains the following for overload testing--
"A flush or self-contained receptacle having a 5-15R, 5-20R, 6-15R or 6-20R configuration shall be subjected to the overload test described in this Section."
So the section covers both 125V and 250V together w/ the same test reqm'ts.
--
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On 4/1/2011 6:14 PM, dpb wrote:

Oooohhh...it's written slightly different than I thought regarding the test load, though...the load is 150% of the rated load for the device rather than a specific test load that I thought I remembered.
So, if manufacturers really want to scrimp and test the devices as separate, they can get by w/ 22-1/2A test load for 15A device and a 30A for 20A device. I don't know if they go to that extreme or not...
--
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In typed:

No , you don't read ANY UL (or any safety spec) and go to work based ONLY on that spec. You have to also read any references it gives, and any specs on how it's connected, to what, and so on. The fact that UL accepts any component is ALWAYS dependent on how that component is used. UL DOES NOT test for real-world applications; it specs what can be connected to it via more specs, NOT components. It is far from putting a UL tag on a complete system when it's only part of a complete system, other parts of which are unknown, so those specs must be interpreted also. Worked meeting UL specs in designs for ten years, compliance to specs for another then.
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On 4/3/2011 2:10 PM, Twayne wrote:

Another useless post.
I have an old UL standard for Snap Switches (like a wall switch).
For AC only switches the tests include the following - at rated voltage: 10,000 operations at rated current 10,000 operations at rated current and power factor around 0.8 10,000 operations at rated current controlling incandescent loads 100 operations at 4.8x rated current and power factor around 0.5
At the end of all these operations the switch has to still be functional.
How is that not "real-world"?
--
bud--


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Mikepier wrote:

http://www.levitonproducts.com/catalog/model_5029.htm?sid D83CFDDBC2021DA991D8F670C60D74&pid08
http://www.plumbersurplus.com/images/prod/6/Leviton-065-05821-00A-rw-163402-240797.jpg
If it's the only receptacle on the circuit, it should match the breaker. So either replace it with the one you pictured, or you could use a 15A (or 20A) 240V duplex receptacle. Using a duplex device would allow you to use a 15A device because now there'd be more than 1 receptacle on the circuit.
(I would probably just leave it alone even though it is not technically correct)
-Bob
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