Question for all you plumbers

Hi Group
New poster here ... so bear with me!! Also, I'm a Brit who has only just moved to the US so be gentle with me if I use unfamiliar terms!!
Having had the unfortunate experience of my third appliance water leak last night ... am currently drying carpets! The catalog is one hose, one heater, one toilet cistern crack over he space of about 10 years.
I was wondering if there was a device that could be put in between the appliance shutoff tap and the hose so that if more than a predetermined volume of water passed the device in (say) five minutes for a toilet cistern or (say) 10 minutes for a washing machine or dishwasher, that it would cut off the water supply?
Any thoughts or other ideas?
Cheers
Den
PS: Happy Thanksgiving
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There is a device for washing machines that allows you to punch a button and it allows X minutes of supply until it shuts it off. You set he time.
Here is one:
http://www.smarthome.com/7115H.html
You might also be interested in something like this:
http://www.safehomeproducts.com/SHP/SM/Water_cop.asp
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Joseph E. Meehan

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there is also a main auto shut off it detects leaks and one that goes on use or time and closes the main valve
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I've been in my home for 11 years and only had one small leak. I think you're having some bad luck. Odds are that you'll go years without another leak.
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I don't know of any such device. But, I'm curious if you have found that American English is different than English English. I've gotten a piece of mail some years ago that wanted me to send them money for the "US English" campaign, to make English the official language of the US.
I don't know how many US people would put the pot on in your flat, so you could watch the telly. If we really had English, the US would need to learn to speak all over again. Cheerio!
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Christopher A. Young
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The only real difference between American English and British English (I speak Canadian English, a blend of the two) is in names of certain objects such as "windshield" (am) or "windscreen" (br) and "trunk" (am) or "boot" (br), for cars and so on, some spellings such as "labor" and "labour" or "center" and "centre", and many words with "z", galvanized in American and Canadian, galvanised in Britain. And of course, the whole world of slang, every English speaking country has common and different slang words. Think for example Australian slang, American slang, Irish slang, Canadian slang and on and on.

last
heater,
cistern
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Stormin Mormonn wrote:

Now you're a plumber??? Regardless, you're as helpful as always.
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Den Murray wrote:

Five or 10 minutes of free running water could cause a huge amount of damage. If you are really serious about this you could consider installing water sensors in places near water, but where water should not be. Examples would be under the toilet, washing machine, dishwasher, fridge (remember that icemaker line?), hot water heater, etc. These sensors would be wired, or you could use wireless, to a valve on the main water supply which would immediately close. If you want more info, try google, or consider posting to comp.home.automation. People there could give you more info (of course there are a couple regulars from there who also post here).
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Den,
You can do that with some sort of electronic timer and a solenoid valve in the water line. But... fine tuning it for all occasions that you're likely to encounter is the big problem.
Check out a whole house device. Any leak where you install a sensor, shuts off the main water to the house, until you reset it. I beleive there's one in the States call WaterCop or something like that. The sensors are wireless so its a breeze to set up. A plumber should install the main shutoff valve.
Good luck, Dave

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