Question about very, very high gloss interior paint


I'm getting ready to paint some woodwork in my home.
A few years ago I had been through a home where the woodwork was painted with an extremely high gloss white paint. I liked how it looked and was interested in doing something similar. The paint was glossy enough it almost looked like an epoxy paint, but I don't think it was. It was way more glossy than standard high gloss interior paint. There were no brush marks in it. It had an almost "glass like" finish. I did a search on google, but didn't identify anything that seemed like that kind of paint.
Any ideas what kind of paint that might have been?
Thanks
Al
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There were no brush marks in it. It

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wrote:

A high gloss enamel vs latex? -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Al wrote:

Possibility: http://www.finepaintsofeurope.com/dutchlac_brilliant.aspx
They offer "free" samples (you pay for S&H): http://www.finepaintsofeurope.com/sample_pot_free.aspx
It's also possible/likely that it was sprayed, which would explain the lack of brush marks. They may have even used a paint that was meant for automotive or marine use where ultra high gloss paints are frequently employed.
Google "ultra high gloss paint" to continue your research.
R
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Al wrote:

Pigmented lacquer, sanded between coats to kill brush marks, rubbed out after 30 day cure.
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High-gloss enamel.
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Thanks All
Great Advice
Al

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Paint a test piece and see if you get the affect you want.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Ben Moore impervo or P&L effecto are top line oils that dry without brush marks if Penetrol is used. If its bare wood a sandable primeer Ben moore enamel underbody should be used. Your job is only as smooth as your sanding and you go up to 320g, its an expensive and time consuming job not for an ametur
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Keep in mind that if you even need to repaint it the new paint won't stick very well unless you thoroughly degloss/sand it. I once painted a bathroom with a high gloss paint and when I repainted it even though I used liquid sandpaper on it, the new paint did not adhere well at all. I wound up pulling the new paint off in sheets and had to sand and redo it all. I will never again use anything shinier then semi-gloss on walls.
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Rustoleum gloss white (oil based) paint. I've used it in trim and it's exactly as you described and this is really good paint that I'd even paint a car with.
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Walmart's got high gloss white oil-based exterior paint. I've used it for everything from all my trim to my bathtub and surround. It's great paint for $15/gallon.
Seriously, it's the walmart brand too. The more you thin it, the less you'll see brush strokes...just like polyurethane.
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Al wrote:

Several years ago (40 or more) There was a chain paint compny by name of "Mary Carter" for awhile they put out a very high gloss interior paint that has a silicone base. It was almost what one could call a permanent paint. You could wash it and it would like the day you put it on. I painted a kitchen with it and it was still like new 30 years later after being washed several times.. Finaly decided to change color and really had a job sanding it down so to paint over. It was so good that think that is why they stopped making it, they were putting themselves out of business. I've never seen anything since to equal. So what you saw may have been some "Mary Carter" Paint. Jack
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A polyurethane enamel will give good results. If brush marks are a problem, use something like penetrol. You can usually find a good variety of polyurethanes at places that sell marine equipment and supplies. I've had consistently good results with Pettit easypoxy topside enamel.
Al wrote:

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