Question about lawn tractor tires.


My original tires that came on my lawn tractor were size 15x6.00-6.
I'm not sure what these numbers are (diameter, width, wheel size ?)
Can I use other size tires on my existing wheels?
Thanks.
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probably 15" diameter, 6 inches wide, 6 ply thick? the manufacturer or previous user picked those out. you might be changing the clearance to the ground, making tractor unsafe?
poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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If the new tires are taller/shorter You may need to adjust the deck if You have an exact want/need of grass height..Changing tire size might throw Yer speedometer off too,,,*grin*.. Last Summer I had just put tubes in every tire on My old Murray Rider,then I broke the seat,snagged and bent the shift lever and blew the engine all in about a 10-15 min span..My yard is'nt huge so I could get along with a push-mower but My Sis(works for JD)gets a good deal from John Deere and is upgrading Her old lawn tractor(12 1/2 horse),,I can buy Her old one for $200,,it is an estimated 25yo,,new seat and fairly recent engine rebuild,,comes with a single stage snow blower attachment..Is it likely to be worth the money? I ca'nt justify buying an 07 model for this yard alone and I do'nt mind tinkering with the old tractors/riders I've had.I do'nt know the original purchase price of the JD,it could be I'm paying more than it cost new! Dean
buffalobill wrote:

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Those early John Deere tractors are highly collectible and well worth the effort to repair / restore. My neighbor still uses a 112 which is much older and has been in continuous service except for an engine rebuild 2 years ago. I'm using a 330 diesel of 85 vintage, that will likely last the rest of my life. If you don't want it, I'll take it.
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Eric in North TX wrote:

I'll agree unless it has been so sorely abused as to be a piece of junk needing more repairs than keep but even then could probably get more for it than asking as a pieces/parts/salvage source on the collector groups...
Still have a 112 also in continuous usage w/ only a short block replacement. I finally broke down and put a new carb on it last summer as the age finally caught up to it and could no longer shim up the air leaks around the throttle shaft to keep a constant-enough mixture. After that, it's like a new one.
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What I want to do is to have two sets of tires. One set of "lawn and turf" and another set of "super bite" tires. I have not tried these tire sizes yet but I do have an industrial tire changer and I don't expect to have any problems demounting and mounting - setting the bead I don't know.
Dean wrote:

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poison snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If very often at all, spare rims would seem simpler/faster...
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I've had the best luck seating the bead using a 1" ratcheting tie down strap on the circumference, winched down tight. Once it begins to accept air, you stop and remove it.
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I'm pretty sure you hit it on the head 15" overall diameter, 6" wide 6" rim. If you mow with it, you would want to stay in the ball park to keep the diameter the same. You could play with width, but it is hard enough to mount proper sized tires, let alone trying to get a different one to seat. If it is like most tractors, the wheels become permanently attached to the axle after a few years and you have to mount the tires with the wheels still in place.
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I had to go buy a wheel puller to get the back rims/tires off the Murray Rider.. Dean
Eric in North TX wrote:

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[...top-posting repaired...] Dean wrote: ...

...
OK, I'll bite... :)
Why on earth for and how?
Never heard of such a thing on any tractor/riding mower from '40's-vintage to present. Have had stuff from most everybody -- Ariens, Gravely. Snapper to JD, A-C, Farmall, IH, Case, ...
It could be a pita on some of the older larger farm tractor rear wheels when they got to 38" and 40" rims owing to the wheel weights plus the ballast weight in the tires themselves on the old straight axles before redesigned to make the rims removable from the wheels or to design a moving mechanism into the wheel hub, but that pretty much was a bygone relic after the 50's and only really applicable to larger, row-crop tractors w/ straight axles for adjustable tread width. Certainly for nothing as small as 15" have I seen anything other than a standard rim although light mowers or lawn tractors may only use 3 or 4 lug bolt pattern instead of automotive 5 or maybe 6 on a pickup. You'd certainly play the devil changing a tire on the inner dual while leaving the outer wheels/rim/tire in place! :)
I'll grant I've never had Murray or Craftsman kind of stuff, so what gives with it? (Sounds like yet another reason to not it it's really a problem... :) )
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The problem lies in the Peerless trans axle wheel mounting scheme. The wheels are nearly a press fit on the axel held on by a single bolt in the center. After a few years the wheel rust welds itself to the axle, I've tried a 20,000lb press with the axle out to try to dislodge them, no joy, heat and industrial penetrating oil, no joy. I've had the bolts loose for years hoping one would fall off. I finally resolved myself to accepting the situation, the only resolution would be new wheels and axles. Thats on my Cub Cadet, my John Deere has proper hubs and lugs.
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Eric in North TX wrote:

That must be the later Cadets, I gather? That's one I've not had, as well, since haven't had local IH-Case dealer for some time. Did have really old Cub, but that, of course, was essentially an shrunk-down H.
I've never had a bearing or other press fit that couldn't eventually get w/ heat and puller/press/whatever -- seems really strange something as light as a wheel rim could be so profoundly stuck. Guess means if ever do break them loose to make them at least an annual p-m sort of thing.
Sounds like a bummer, for sure... :( Guess I'll know to look closely if ever see one at an auction and am tempted... :) )
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The wheel puller worked but bent the rims outer edge,,no problem to bend them back close enuff for tubes and the low speeds of the rider,,tubes were the mission anyway as I was tired of leaking tubeless..My Murray has a large washer and a clip washer to hold the rear wheels on,the left was without any washers for *Who knows how long?* and it stayed on,,even when I wanted it off!! That little 10 horse,rear engine could climb and mow tho!Just gotta climb at an angle and watch the front wheel on the high side! It's good to hear that JD has a better wheel system as that's the next old rig I'm going to have,then maybe it'll be time for a brand spankin new one..An old Craftsman was My first victim,picked it up dirt cheap just to learn,,the Murray too..The JD is going to cost as much to buy as the other 2 cost to buy and add a few parts parts to..A year or 2 with the JD and I'll use My Sis's 25% off and buy new. Eric in North TX wrote:

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