Question about garage doors:

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They make garage doors that use counterweights instead of springs. Does anyone have any ideas as to why they are not more widely used? In fact I could probably convert a spring powered garage door to a counterweight if I took the time.
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recyclebinned wrote on Tue, 04 Dec 2012 10:43:00 -0800:

Ignoring the fact the spring acts like a counterweight, what is the advantage you're looking for in the counterweight doors?
And, how would these counterweights work? For example, do these counterweights move up and down contrary to the door?
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Ignoring the fact the spring acts like a counterweight, what is the advantage you're looking for in the counterweight doors?
You never have to replace a spring. You may have to replace a cable that holds the weight but thats much easier and faster to do than replacing a spring.
And, how would these counterweights work? For example, do these counterweights move up and down contrary to the door?
Yes. I could give links here to some companies but that would be like advertising But you could just Google counterweight garage door on Google images.
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On Tue, 04 Dec 2012 11:40:40 -0800, recyclebinned wrote:

http://www.thermostop.com/thermostop/sites/all/files/industrial_garage_counterweight.gif
http://www.remotadoor.com.au/what-is-a-counterweight-garage-door /
What is a Counterweight Garage Door?
A counterweight garage door is a great choice for your home and garage. There are many advantage and benefits, but just in case you've never seen one of our excellent doors, here's what a counterweight door is:
One Piece - Single frame construction, clad in almost any material, Not a roller door or sectional door.
Tilt Door - The counterweight garage door lifts up in a tilting motion.
Weight Balanced Lifting Mechanisms - The weight of the door is balanced with a counterweight on the side of the door's opening
No Tracks Required - there are no tracks on the ceiling or walls of your garage.
Simple Mechanism - The remote control mechanism sits on one side of the garage door opening
Maintenance Free - Each Remotadoor garage door's mechanism is engineered and made to precision so that everything is in balance. No springs to stretch, no fiddly parts or guides. No Size or Weight Limits - We've done doors over 9 metres in length and seen them clad with all types of materials, from timber and ply to various sheet metal. Our qualified engineers ensure that your Remotadoor is perfectly balanced and operates with ease. Great For Tight Spaces - Unlike many other garage doors on the market today a Remotadoor counterweight garage door can be made to fit with very little space around the door.
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On 12/4/2012 12:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

springs wear out and break.

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On Tue, 04 Dec 2012 13:00:14 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Or people do stupid things with them and get killed: http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/investigations/face/docs/04ny135.pdf
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On 12/4/2012 12:57 PM, Jim Jones wrote:

...
Just like old window weights worked...and the same problem that made them go the way of the dodo--they've got to have somewhere to travel. In a window it was easy enough to build in a cavity of only half the height of the window (even though it left the uninsulated space). In a garage w/ the length of travel it's more of a logistics problem...doable, but kinda' a pita sorta' thing...
--



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dpb-
Great analogy... I was thinking elevator but sash & sash weights are a much better example.
cheers Bob
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DD_BobK wrote:

As the garage door goes up, the spring tension lessons to almost zero.
Do weights differentially get lighter to accomplish the same task?
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Hmmm good question...
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wrote:

Easy. The weights sit on a spring.
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On Tue, 04 Dec 2012 10:43:00 -0800, recyclebinned wrote:

How do they work?
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On Tue, 04 Dec 2012 19:45:09 +0000, Robert Shapiro wrote:

http://www.begleyoverheaddoors.com/Data/userFiles//dr-counterweight1.jpg
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On 12/4/2012 12:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Why would you want to? While it's workable it's a lot more klunky of a system than the spring. I do favor the extension springs over the torsion ones, however, as being simpler to deal with.
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I would bet if you look at the counterweight doors they cost significantly more than the spring type. Also, from the couple of diagrams I've seen, the weights wind up near the entrance, on either side. Who wants that when the spring type use room that doesn't intrude?
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On Tue, 4 Dec 2012 17:25:24 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Can you imagine the weights falling? Oh, the children! At least torsion springs are fairly innocuous when they let loose.
BTW, just how is winding up a weight easier than a spring? The energy stored is necessarily the same.
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On Tuesday, December 4, 2012 5:36:25 PM UTC-8, snipped-for-privacy@at.biz wrote:

The weights have or can have a housing over them so that nobody can accidentally come in contact with them and also the weights consist of several bars that are individually easy to lift as opposed to winding or pulling a spring.
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On Dec 5, 1:07am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Now for a typical home garage door, compare what it takes to do the above with what it takes to install the spring type. The spring system sure seems easier to install and less expensive to me. Then factor in that at the end of the garage, right by the door, you're going to have some long vertical enclosure with weights. In my house, on one garage door that's close to a corner, I have an outside door and a light switch. Kiss that goodbye with the weights. Even if I didn't have that there, I'd rather use that area for leaning up rakes, brooms, etc instead of wasted space. And then you have those vertical weights taking up space on both sides of the garage door. The springs of either type don't take up any space that is usable, aren't in the way, etc.
Bottom line, I see lots of drawbacks and no compelling advantage. In 50 years I've had one spring break and it was easy to fix.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Springs break about once every 10,000 cycles but replacing them is simple. Torsion springs cost about $30 each and ordering them is simple. Spring winding bars cost about $10 and last a lifetime. Replacement of a torsion spring takes a half hour and is very easy. The only ones who warn against diy are those who have never done it.
How often do counterweights need maintenance?
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On Tue, 4 Dec 2012 22:07:31 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

accidentally come in contact with them and also the weights consist of several bars that are individually easy to lift as opposed to winding or pulling a spring.
Which takes valuable floor space. You could also cover the springs with a guard, if you're really that paranoid. Kinda silly, expensive, solution to a non-problem, though, isn't it?
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