Quartz Space Heater

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Mike Hartigan wrote:

<snip>
I'm surprised the marketeers have never tried that argument as an advantage of electric heat over gas or other alternatives. :-)
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It isn't an advantage as long as the heating system is thermostat regulated, using electric will save gas, but may cost more.
Joe Fischer
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says...

The problem is that electricity costs so much more per unit of energy than the alternatives that it can't be sold as an economic alternative. Electric heat is 100% efficient. It simply costs more.
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It doesn't cost more in all areas of the world.
In FACT, a natural gas fired, forced air furnace cost more to run than straight electric heat last year.
Now just think of the savings they could have had with a heat pump!
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usenet.com> says...

True. I'm speaking in conventional terms in the US. Obviously, YMMV.

Depends on where you live in the country. While my figgerin' could be wrong, at around $0.08/kwh, (Chicago area), I calculated that natural gas would need to be in the ballpark of $2 per therm in order for electricity to be competitive.

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watts
the
your
it
you
You're correct, and natural was up to over $2.50 a therm last winter.
So input that into a 80% furnace and we have trouble.
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message [snip]

While my memory is not flawless, I don't recall my rate getting much over $1.25/therm last winter. (and I already factored in the typical 80% efficiency rating).
FWIW, I did some more figgerin' and came up with $1.92 as the break even point at $.08/kwh, assuming 80% efficiency (this is all exclusive of delivery charges, taxes, etc.). I understand that electricity prices in other major metropolitan markets are about double mine, so the break even price would be closer to $4.00/therm there. The bottom line is that, barring any major technological breakthroughs in electricity production, it's not likely that electricity will be cheaper than gas as a source of residential heat anytime soon.
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horseshit. try paying $.24/kw for electricity. lets see....we burn natural gas to produce electricity.....and electricity is cheaper? LOL too funny.

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On Jan 29, 9:01 am, snipped-for-privacy@gonefishin.net wrote: [snip]

Kind of reminds me of a local grocery chain that used to differentiate themselves from their competitors a few years ago by saying that their 'gound beef' was actually ground 'steak'. I often wondered where the economic sense was in taking the steak that they were selling for $3+ per lb, expending the extra labor to grind it, only to sell it for under $1 per lb.
Of course, the heat generated by the grinder probably offset their cost to heat the store (just trying to stay on topic ;-)
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wrote in message

We're currently at $.052 /kwh up here.
http://www.cowlitzpud.org/pdf/3-2-06.Rate%20Schedule%201.pdf

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I'm not sure that this is the one the OP was interested in but here is one:
EdenPURE Quartz Infrared Portable Heater. They will refund your money within 60 days if not satisfied. Their number is 1-800-284-9557. I have one on order and should receive it this week. I DO plan to return it if it is not up to my expectations.
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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I forgot to add - for detailed information go to http://www.edenpure.com
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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Is that a seasonal rate? I don't see any time parameters associated with it. PG&E changes rates so often that they are very clear about the effective dates of the rate sheets ;-)
http://www.pge.com/rates/tariffs/ResElecCurrent.xls $0.114-$0.369/kWh, depending on how much you use. Average is $0.164
Propane is $1.95 per gallon.
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wrote in message

Not every power supplier burns natural gas for it's source. Our electric rates are much cheaper since they burn coal in this area.
I'm also not saying that electric is ALWAYS cheaper all over the US or saying that it stays that way. (we were talking about 8 cents/kw vers high priced natural and using a heat pump to save money)
Last year our natural price was over $2.50 per therm while electric was under .08 cents/kw. Now put that in your pipe and smoke it! :-)
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wrote in message

Where is electricity .24/kw?
The utility where I live burns minimal gas just enough so they can base their production cost on it. For example - using nuclear it cost 1 unit to produce one mw of electricity, two units of coal to produce one mw of electricity and ng cost 8 units to produce one mw of electricity. They list their cost as 8 units to create one mw of electricity and it's perfectly legal under the recently enacted rules re: deregulation. BGE works something like this 50% of the electricity is produced using nuclear, 40% using coal and maybe 5% other and 5% using ng. They legally state their cost is 8 units per mw of electricity.
Can you spell rip-off. There will never be anything resembling a legitimate completive market for electricity. Why? it can't be stored,there's no real competition, the local electric power grid weren't designed to ship electricity long distances, due line resistance there's a greater power loss the further electric is shipped and it stresses the power grids which were designed for local consumption. Deregulated electric rates will never save consumers money over sanely regulated rates. The next big rip of coming will be in "delivery charges" already in some areas "delivery charges" and "customer charges" are approaching the over priced cost of deregulated electricity.
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Nowhere, altho PV people get 50 cents/kWh in Germany.
You might enjoy learning the difference between power and energy.
Nick
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wrote:

My God .50/kw how to those people afford live and how to manufacturers sell anything that competitive? What are PV people? I wonder where the most expensive electricity is in the US and the cheapest?
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I don't know what it's like today, but, as I recall, customers of some of the municipal power companies in New York that were buying hydro power from PASNY were paying something like $0.004/kwh (yes, that's less than 1/2 cent) as recently as 1999. Needless to say, these were all electric homes.
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a quick google search returned with thsi
residental rates .04038\\kwh +$6.25 delivery charge Still look relatively cheap to me. http://jamestownbpu.com/electric/rates.php
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No... $0.50/kWh :-)
Nick
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