Q: Water Conditioning Equipment

The neutralizer which removes acid from well water backwashes every six days. The backwash lasts 25 minutes.
The softener's backwash also lasts 25 minutes, every six days, but the pattern is different. The first stage is for 15 minutes, then it goes into a "quiet" mode for 55 minutes, followed by the final stage of 10 minutes.
First, what is the purpose of the back wash for the neutralizer? for the softener?
And why are the patterns so radically different? Thank You.
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Jack wrote:

A softener is regenerated, certain types of filters are regenerated and others are 'backwashed' or upflow. Regeneration means there is a chemical used to 'clean' the media in the filter or softener. One or two cycle positions in a regeneration are backwash and then there are the rinses; slow rinse and settle rinse. A backwashed filter has one or two backwash cycle positions and a rinse. Upflow filters do not have either; and IO are a poor choice.
Each cycle position is timed in minutes and the number varies based on the water quality, volume of water treated between regenerations or 'backwashes', type of filter (mineral in it) and the volume of mineral etc.. All those minutes are in your 25 minutes BUT, backwash alone should not be for all those minutes or the control valve is not set up correctly and there would be no settle rinse cycle position. The total time of a regeneration for the vast majority of softeners is 75-90 minutes although the control valve timer may not show it being back to the service position for up to 3 hours.
The need for backwash or regeneration is to 'clean' the mineral bed (media) somewhat like replacing the filters on your vehicle engine or house heating/AC systems; which should always be done on a timely basis or the equipment suffers, fuel and energy use increases and more maintenance will be required in the future or it will fail. Six days is a bit long for an AN filter and softeners should not go for more than 7-9 days between regenerations.
BTW, a "conditioner" has more than one media in the tank, where the main media is resin, it is not a good idea to mix a filter mineral with resin; especially carbon or a heavy mineral.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Jack wrote:

A softener is regenerated, certain types of filters are regenerated and others are 'backwashed' or upflow. Regeneration means there is a chemical used to 'clean' the media in the filter or softener. One or two cycle positions in a regeneration are backwash and then there are the rinses; slow rinse and settle rinse. A backwashed filter has one or two backwash cycle positions and a rinse. Upflow filters do not have either; and IO are a poor choice.
Each cycle position is timed in minutes and the number varies based on the water quality, volume of water treated between regenerations or 'backwashes', type of filter (mineral in it) and the volume of mineral etc.. All those minutes are in your 25 minutes BUT, backwash alone should not be for all those minutes or the control valve is not set up correctly and there would be no settle rinse cycle position. The total time of a regeneration for the vast majority of softeners is 75-90 minutes although the control valve timer may not show it being back to the service position for up to 3 hours.
The need for backwash or regeneration is to 'clean' the mineral bed (media) somewhat like replacing the filters on your vehicle engine or house heating/AC systems; which should always be done on a timely basis or the equipment suffers, fuel and energy use increases and more maintenance will be required in the future or it will fail. Six days is a bit long for an AN filter and softeners should not go for more than 7-9 days between regenerations.
BTW, a "conditioner" has more than one media in the tank, where the main media is resin, it is not a good idea to mix a filter mineral with resin; especially carbon or a heavy mineral.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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A softener is regenerated, certain types of filters are regenerated and others are 'backwashed' or upflow. Regeneration means there is a chemical used to 'clean' the media in the filter or softener. One or two cycle positions in a regeneration are backwash and then there are the rinses; slow rinse and settle rinse. A backwashed filter has one or two backwash cycle positions and a rinse. Upflow filters do not have either; and IO are a poor choice.
Each cycle position is timed in minutes and the number varies based on the water quality, volume of water treated between regenerations or 'backwashes', type of filter (mineral in it) and the volume of mineral etc.. All those minutes are in your 25 minutes BUT, backwash alone should not be for all those minutes or the control valve is not set up correctly and there would be no settle rinse cycle position. The total time of a regeneration for the vast majority of softeners is 75-90 minutes although the control valve timer may not show it being back to the service position for up to 3 hours.
The need for backwash or regeneration is to 'clean' the mineral bed (media) somewhat like replacing the filters on your vehicle engine or house heating/AC systems; which should always be done on a timely basis or the equipment suffers, fuel and energy use increases and more maintenance will be required in the future or it will fail. Six days is a bit long for an AN filter and softeners should not go for more than 7-9 days between regenerations.
BTW, a "conditioner" has more than one media in the tank, where the main media is resin, it is not a good idea to mix a filter mineral with resin; especially carbon or a heavy mineral.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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Have you read the manual?
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