Q: Condesation Between Window Panes

In between the panes of glass on almost all of the windows in my home, I have noticed an increase of condensation (small droplets of water and 'fogging').
Is there any way to resolve this problem without replacing all of the windows? How can I identify the cause?
Thanks for any help -
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Scott wrote:

There are two possibilities.
Most likely they are double pane windows. That moisture means they have lost their seal and there is no way to fix the glass. The glass needs to be replaced. You do not need to replace the windows. You do not need to deal with the original window manufacturer or contractor. If they are still under warrantee, then you will want to deal with them and many of these windows carry a long warrantee.
If they are storm windows, it is a matter of sealing the interior window better and venting the exterior window better. The moisture comes from inside the home most of the time.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Scott wrote:

If these are insulated windows (two panes of glass with an airspace between), the seal between the two panes has broken. There is no way to clean them out. After a while they will turn milky white in between. If insulated glass, was this house in a hurricane or earthquake lately? You might break a seal in a window or glass door by slamming it, but it is very unusual for a number of window seals to fail at once.
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Thanks for your reply. No earthquake or hurricanes here... I imagine it's a low quality window - I will have to look into the warranty (I imagine there is none left).
Scott

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Also, how old is the house? double-pane windows pretty regularly have their seals go bad after 10-20 years, depending on a variety of factors. It's just a design 'feature' you've gotta live with.

I
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Thanks for your replies! I have another questions - can the fact that moisture is appearing between the panes (where the gas used to be), be demonstrative that the insulation is actually gone? The temperature is starting to drop here, so I would like to know if I will be spending money to heat the yard!

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Not as bad as just a single pane, but not as good as a sealed pane.
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Scott wrote:

It looses some insulation value, but it is still much better than a single pane window and better than most storm windows.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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