PVC Suggestions/Help Requested MAPP Gas Question

2 Part Question:
I have had to fix several PVC pipes in my home. The first was probably the result of a frozen pipe in the main pipe to my home. It was roughly a 300 feet run of pipe wth the break occuring maybe 5 feet from the main. The pipe had been in the ground in use for approx 30 years (don't know if that matters.)
The second problem I had was where a 1.5" PVC connected into an "enlarger" feeding a 2" pipe. After 30 years of carrying gray water only, the pipe separated from the enlarger. Like the glue just failed.
My question is in both case what seemed like a simple fix was anythng but (for me at least). The problem is that the in both cases the connection I was repairing was never square, but always slightly angled enough to be a problem. Not enough to require an elbow, but enought that the pipe didn't want to seat squarely. On the outside repair, I had to uncover move pipe so I could flex it a bit to fit "Better" but there must be a more professional way then that. I know I didn't explain the problem well, but I'm not sure I can do a better job.
If someone can help me with advice on fixing PVC pipe, I'd be happy to use the advice in the future and I'd be most greatful to the person.
QUESTION #2: What is different about the Nozzle that one uses with MAPP gas vs the one used with regular butane? I had to use butane nozzle on a MAPP canister and it seemed to work ok. I can't swear the flame was as hot but it seemed to do the job. I would think if it was a matter of safety, they wouldn't make it so one could interchange the nozzles. Can anyone answer this?
Thanks RB
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On 1/23/2012 2:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@notmysig.com wrote:

http://plumbing.hardwarestore.com/52-300-rubber-flex-fittings.aspx
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What is "regular butane"? I've never heard of using butane for plumbing torches.
And, where does one get a butane nozzle, that fits a Mapp tank?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
QUESTION #2: What is different about the Nozzle that one uses with MAPP gas vs the one used with regular butane? I had to use butane nozzle on a MAPP canister and it seemed to work ok. I can't swear the flame was as hot but it seemed to do the job. I would think if it was a matter of safety, they wouldn't make it so one could interchange the nozzles. Can anyone answer this?
Thanks RB
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On Jan 23, 7:52 am, "Stormin Mormon"

He probably means propane. And true MAPP isn't available anymore. The one company making it closed up. The replacement is MAPP/pro which unfortunately doesn't burn as hot. AFAIK, in general either will work with the same plumber type torches. I've used them interchangeably. The difference being you don't get as hot a flame with propane, but it's fine for soldering, unless you have a large, tough to heat joint.
For joining pipes, those Ferncos can be a solution for waste pipes, but not water pipes. For the long run of PVC in the ground, one would think the pipe repair would be in alignment. If it's not, then digging out a couple more feet of it so you can get more movement is what I've always done.

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My torch head claims it works for both. Go figure.
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On Jan 23, 1:09 am, snipped-for-privacy@notmysig.com wrote:

# 1) PVC pipe up to 2" or so can be mildly bent using an electric heat gun (hair dryer on steroids). Take your time, get it uniformly warm and keep pressure on it until it has the right alignment. PVC ells are also available at most decent plumbing distributors in very small angles, IIRC down to 1/16 bends. These techniques have worked for me quite well in the past to solve unexpected problems.
Joe
Joe
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Filling the pipe with sand or a spring can help prevent kinking.
My neighbor's a Boy Scout leader and he helped his troop make a bunch of pairs of Snow Shoes with PVC using the bending methods and jig described here:
http://www.pvcworkshop.com/bendpipe.htm
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On 1/23/2012 1:23 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

When I was working out in The Marshall Islands as an electrician, we needed to bend some 4" PVC conduit and didn't have a PVC oven on the job site so we held one end of the pipe to the side exhaust on one of our 2 and a half ton diesel trucks and throttled the engine up while controlling the flow of hot gas through the pipe with a piece of wood. It got the PVC hot enough for us to bend without damaging or kinking it. I've used the tailpipe exhaust of a pickup truck to do the same thing back here in The States. Here's a link to the type of tools I really needed. ^_^
http://www.toolup.com/search.aspx?SearchTerm=pvc+heater
TDD
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