PVC Sewer vs DWV

The local 'big box' has 6' white IPS PVC DWV with cellular core. I've done a little research and it is unclear if I can use the white PVC for an outside replacement of the 6" Clay pipe. The codes on the DWV pipe indicate it is F-891-00, schedule 40, NSF, and JM 30/35. The building department for the city has told me I can use schedule 40. But is the white OK for US outside applications? I know green is usually used. Any advise is appreciated.
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kstar wrote:

Correction that's 6" white IPS PVC. What I am doing is replacing clay pipes that have developed a leak. The whole thing is complicated by the number of exits from the house on this run and a chipmunk that has created a cavity under part of the pipe. . There are 3 cast iron exits within 12 feet. It is a septic conversion. Would also like to ask about fitting all the connections together. I bought rubber donuts that will convert the 2" and 3" cast iron to 4" plastic. And I have a 4" to 4" rubber ring for the 4" cast iron. It seems like the only way to make this work is to make one connection at a time starting from the clay to PVC connection. Plan is to: Dry fit and mark the pipe to the first connection to make sure it will fit. Disconnect and install the donut on the first connection so that it is back far enough to not interfere with the putting the last PVC piece in place. Then connect the PV to clay (rubber boot) and glue my way to the first connection off a PVC T connector. Finally pounding the donut into the PVC. Then repeat to the next connection. Having difficulty imagining how to make sure it all fits correctly. Using cross marks at the connectors will help on the PVC. But the clay to pvc connection will be harder to mark and get correct. Any corrections to the above or other ideas would be helplful.
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I'm sure you will live to regret your decision.
Why not tear up and replace the whole thing while you doing the hatchet job.

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Line runs as diagrammed behind the house (this was a septic conversion in the '70's) makes a turn at the house corner goes 15' concrete pad and then 80+' to the street at 10' to 12'. Two other house lines combine with the line somewhere in the front of the house. Don't want to tacke that. Just want to fix the problem.
DK wrote:

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I can see a 3 inch line coming thru the foundation, but after that you should NOT have anything less than a 4 inch line going to the city service hookup.
Otherwise you are talking temporary fixes. But that's okay, as long as you know that you will be revisiting the problem again in a year or two.

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Really, you should just consider yourself the working head of a roto-rooter tool.
You are going in at the new clean out trap either right next to the foundation or possible just inside, and heading for the street connection. You don't want to run into sharp corners or transitions before you get there. If you do run nto rubber or roots, you want to chew right thru it and keep on going..
That's what it is all about.

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I am having difficulty following your post.
Are you sure about 6" pipe? Schools and office buildings and cities have 6" runs, but they would be rare in residential.
White PVC is the norm. Green is usually light weight drainage pipe or really heavy pressure pipe with O ring seals.
Fernco or Mission couplings would be my choice for tying onto the cast iron stub outs. These are made with different diameter ends to transition from cast to clay or whatever and to change diameters. Establish the fittings on the cast iron stub outs first, cut the pipe runs as required. Make sure you have a clean out at the head end of the pipe so you can rooter through the main line and catch all the stubs outs. ______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Thanks for the post. Yes it is 6". I have it exposed and it matches size with the 6" PVC. The donuts I referred to are Fernco. The 4" to 4" connector is a Pipeconx and has two metal straps at each end to seal the connection so I am OK there. Question: If I start at the cast iron and work to the T won't I have trouble fitting into the T and making sure I don't change the position and grade of the 6" line. The problem with the leak started because there is a low spot in the line at the connections. I want to make sure I don't recreate the problem.
Diagram <-- I I I 6" ============== each = is 1 foot Low spot
DanG wrote:

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When you say "it" is exposed, you mean the existing clay pipe? 6" clay pipe is quite a big bigger in outer diameter than 6" Schedule 40 pipe, so if the outer diameters match, then it is probably 5" clay pipe.
Cheers, Wayne
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Thanks Wayne. The clay pipe is exposed and the diameter is bigger than the 6 in. PVC and it matches the conversion boot for 6" clay to 6" PVC.
Wayne Whitney wrote:

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4 inch line for a residence drains better the water moves the solids along better
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