PVC leak

We had our sprinkler system (pvc manual valves & check valve) demolished by vandals and my husband bought all new stuff and glued them together. But rather than replacing the PVC than came from our well pump, he connected the new fittings to the old using a piece of pvc that he glued INSIDE the old pipe and new fittings. Only problem is that the connector he used didn't really fit snuggly and it is leaking and water is dripping down the outside of our (cement block) garage wall. Is there some way to patch this? I'm afraid that to do it right we'd have to get all new fittings and start all over again as everything is glued tightly together with only the connectors visable (no pipe connector is view). I was toying with making some pvc filings and adding pvc cement and stuffing it in the leak area. Do you think this would work? Appreciate your suggestions. The leak is heavy enough that if I put the sprinklers on for a couple hours, I'm finding water making its way INSIDE the garage (Not sure where its actually coming from as I don't feel wetness on the inside pump/pvc. I have no idea if this water could cause problems if just left to leak but I'd sure like to fix it.
Thanks!
Sandy
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Consider marrying a REAL handyMAN. We're worth out weight in gold. Please send photos and resume for consideration.
Sorry...I couldn't resist.

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Find the leak. Apply a vacume to the pipe section somehow. A siphon hose from the pipe to a bucket several feet lower than the leak might work. Apply PVC cement to the leak so that it is sucked into the pipe by the vacume. If you are lucky, you might seal it this way.
Brady make proper sized "inside" PVC fittings. But why not just replace what is there with a proper outsige coupling.
Bob

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I just went out and looked at it again. At first I thought it wouldn't work because hubby glued the inside "connector" to the old pvc pipe that had a piece of the old broken connector still attached. I also looked at the pump (inside the garage) and see where there is what looks like a large screw on connector. I'm thinking that if I cut through the outside (new) pvc, pick off the caulk that filled the hole in the garage wall that the pipe goes through...that I ought to be able to twist off and replace the old pvc coming from the pump....and THAT one we could then use an outside connector on. Should this "screw" fitting come off easily?
Hope somebody can understand that....at least I sorta know what I'm talking about. Maybe I SHOULD trade hubby in for a real handiMAN!
Sandy
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I cant see what you have from where I'm sitting but it sounds like you can just unscrew that fitting, any kind of wrench that will fit it will loosen it fairly easy. Hard part might be fully removing what you cut off there and then gluing up new fittings for a replacement in the confined space - if the suction comes off the pump easily maybe remove it and move the pump out a bit before attempting to make the identical length replacement section then you can glue the farthest joint of the outside coupling on last.

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I would think that the fitting you are talking about should come off fine.
Bob
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sandy writes:

It's tedious and tricky, but I have successfully removed solvent "welded" PVC fittings several times by sawing carefully along and through the fitting and then prying and chipping it off. The "welded" junction is typically weaker than the bulk material, making this possible. In some situations this is better than replumbing back to a "good" spot.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (sandy) wrote in message

This is real red-neckish. Get a coupling that fits the new piece of pipe. Cut it in half. Try to clear away any bumps, glue buildup, dirt from the shoulder by the the join. Now liberally spread glue inside the two halves, outside the pipe and against the shoulder (very important). Apply the two halves and hold for glue set. Cross fingers. If it doesn't work you have just made an even bigger mess.
Harry K
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pvc & good glue are remarkable stuff Riding mowered too close to the lawn pump and busted off a hose bib. Suddenly its raining funny / instantly soaked. glued together a busted 3/4 pvc at a crude jagged break with at least one found chip planning on replacing it later ... been four years and it still holds 45+ lbs on my sprinkler system.

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On 7 Oct 2004 04:54:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (sandy) wrote:

I'm not sure I understand. Is the leaking connection accessible or not?
If it is accessible, you can fill it with PVC shavings and glue it. Then wrap the joint area with something like Pow-R Wrap http://www.mountaintop.net/intro.html and then reinforce the repair bu adding a hose clamp on each side of the joint. A hose clamp looks like this: http://www.partssystems.com/shop/products.html?category_id=PWRSEAL
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