PVC Compression coupling - suitable for outdoor water pipe, and life span?

While I was digging up my water pipes, I came across a PVC compression coupling that was used to connect two metal pipes together. How suitable is this? This is in the main water line that goes into my house, and I"m concerned about the life span of this coupling. It doesn't leak at this point, but what kind of life span do these things have? If I leave it, am I going to have to dig it up in a couple of years when it starts to leak? I have most of this pipe dug up right now, and it would be easier to replace it all now than to have to dig it back up in a couple of years. OTOH if these things are good for a few decades, then I'm just gonna fill the ditch in and leave it.
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Boy, you sure can start enough new threads about the same thing. In the original thread you said the pipe from the street was 40 years old, rusted, in unknown condition, etc. Now you have it dug up and you're worried about just one fitting? Why not just replace the whole run with whatever is approved and typically used in your area? As I stated before, around here, this part of NJ, that would be black poly 1" pipe.
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How much does peace of mind factor into this?
How hard/expensive would it be to eliminate the fitting by replacing the line?
Somewhere in between those 2 items is your answer.
If someone in this group - someone sitting at a keyboard and not looking into your trench - tells you that the fitting is good for another 20 years and you bury it again, will that give you enough peace of mind to sleep well for next few years?
You yourself said "it would be easier to replace it all now than to have to dig it back up in a couple of years"
How much peace of mind would it give you to know that the fitting was gone and you knew that you had new material, end to end?
The one piece I can't speak to is the cost, but I assume you can find that out fairly easily, if you don't already know it. Only you know the crossover point between complete peace of mind and the hit on your budget.
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On Thu, 31 May 2012 12:54:42 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

First time I heard that was from the first lawyer I ever hired. I was young. Then I started hearing it more and more. Now I practically live by it.
--
Vic

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Just replace the ENTIRE LINE, leave nothing of the existing line....!!!!!!!
if you want overkill and PEX is permitted in your area......
Run the PEX inside a PVC line from curb to meter....
this minimizes digging in the future and protects the line from mechanical damage. if the PEX ever has a problem just dig at each end and snake a new line thru the PVC, use schedule 40 for added durability....
I wouldnt use copper too many people are stealing it:(
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Good idea for the double-layered line, and not that $$ either.
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Compression fittings in general have a good service life. If in doubt about that one fitting, replace it with a metal one.
Harry K
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Re PVC Compression coupling - suitable for outdoor water pipe, and life span?:

They are usually good for decades unless you disturb them. You didn't touch it, shake it, vibrate it or move it when you dug it up did you?
--
Work is the curse of the drinking class.

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