PVC and sewer drain repair question

I'm repairing a 2' section of pvc sewer drain pipe just outside of my house. I plan on using rubber clamps to join the sections (unless someone has a reason not to). Question is how flush do the pieces of pipe have to be to avoid having toilet paper, etc. get stuck where they join and thereby causing a blockage? Is this a legitimate worry of mine? If I use pvc glue in addition to the clamp, will it fill gaps at all? Any other thoughts? Also, the section that I'm repairing appears to have gotten bent (or always was), so that it isn't a steady drop from the house towards the street. If a couple foot section doesn't drop, or even goes up a tad, is that a big problem? Thanks for any and all help!
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Jack wrote:

Cut the new section of pipe about 1/2" shorter than the gap. That will give you 1/4" at each end allow it to drop in place. You're probably using the Mission-style coupling (hose clamp at each) which does not have a "filler" ridge in the rubber. The resulting 1/4" gap between pipe sections won't cause any problems, but if you want, file the inside of the pipe to a slight bevel.
If the settling only caused a slight "belly", I wouldn't worry.
Jim
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using. On the street-side end I had that much or less of a gap, simply a result of the cuts not both being perpendicular to the pipe. That's why I was wondering if I needed to sand/file them to make them flush. Thanks for the tip on beveling it. Am I okay on the other end? Situation there is I'm coming from a 3" (the new section is 4"), but where the 3" broke it has a collar on it (from a snake-access port - sorry, don't know the official name), and hence it's about 3.75". I'm using the 4" rubber clamp, but it seems to be able to tighten down on it enough. But I cut the new 4" section so that it slips around the 3". Since this is the "upstream" end, I didn't think this would be a problem. Or is it? I thought it was better that having it the same length, or the 1/4" you suggested, since it will be about 1/4" larger all around, too.
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Jack wrote: <SNIP>

As long as you can make a tight seal (or nearly tight), the increase from 3" to 4" won't be a problem. A little Kludgey, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do...
Jim
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Why wouldn't you do it right with a PVC coupling and the proper solvent?

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not always possible when cutting into exisiting pipe. think about it. you simply cant get it in there.
randy

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wrote:

The beauty of PVC is that you *always* can get it in there. Repair couplings have no shoulder, the entire coupling slides over the pipe, then when in place it slides out over the joint.
Jeff

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yes, a repair coupling will work. but a regular coupling wont. sorry if this wasnt clear.
randy
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wrote:

sprinkler system next door used these to repair my neighbor's drain pipe when they cut into it. Seemed like it would work, save for my concern of things catching. From what I read on the PVC solvent/glue can, the "right" way seemed like a lot more work, and if it wasn't necessary...?

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that little crack is gonna fill with sh** real fast and its not going to be a problem.
as for it going up a bit, i think the deciding factor is this: is the lowest part of the high spot in the pipe, higher or the same level as where the drain started from? if so, you got problems. if not it should be ok.
randy

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wrote:

flushes, etc. go down, they all seemed to carry-on. Though at the time I hadn't noticed the slight rise, I have to assume it was there; I didn't notice it until I put the new piece in, and it's straight. So I'm guessing it's overall downhill (this is right next to the house, and in-between it and the house is the access port, so can't get a good level measurement). So I guess I'll just have some stagnant water in this area until the next batch comes down, and no biggie. Thanks again.

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